A History of Ancient Geography Among the Greeks and Romans: From the Earliest Ages Till the Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1879 - Classical geography
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Page 256 - When he has no means of determining between them, he adds, he contents himself with repeating the conflicting statements : but it does not seem to have occurred to him that the Roman authorities, having the advantage of measured roads, were in most cases, if not in all, entitled to the greater credit.8 In describing Brundusium he notices briefly the course of the Appian Way the great highway from Rome to the provinces of the East, which in his * v. 4, 9, p. 248. i The first distance is almost...
Page 196 - Hercules, several days' sail from the coast of Africa. This island abounded in all manner of riches. The soil was exceedingly fertile. The scenery was diversified by rivers, mountains, and forests.
Page 309 - Of the great peninsula of India, to the south of a line drawn from the mouths of the Indus to those of the Ganges, he gives us no particulars at all. Altogether it may safely be asserted that while Strabo in his account of India has shown much judgement in the collection of his materials from preceding writers, and a 4 IV.
Page 312 - Wilson's Ariana, p. 121. all Upper Asia still remained in almost precisely the same condition which it had attained under the successors of Alexander. 23. The last section of his fifteenth book is devoted by Strabo to Persis, or Persia properly so called, with the adjacent province of Susiana. Both of these districts were of special interest to the Greeks as having been so long the seat of the great Persian Empire that had extended its dominions from the banks of the Indus to the shores of the...
Page 418 - Arabia, or Cane in the frankincense-bearing region. There is also a third port which is called Muza, which is not frequented by those sailing to India, but by the merchants who trade in frankincense and other Arabian perfumes. In the interior is a city, the capital of the kingdom, named Sapphar, and another called Save. But for those whose course is directed to India it is most advantageous to start from Ocelis. From thence they sail with the wind called Hippalus in forty days to the first commercial...
Page 418 - They begin the navigation in the middle of summer, before the rising of the dog-star, or immediately after its appearance, and arrive in about thirty days at Ocelis in Arabia, or Cane in the frankincense-bearing region. There is also a third port which is called Muza, which is not frequented by those sailing to India, but by the merchants who trade in frankincense and other Arabian perfumes. In the interior is a city, the capital of the kingdom, named Sapphar, and another called Save. But for those...
Page 197 - ... journey to an island called Ictis (St. Michael's Mount), whence the traders from Gaul conveyed it across the Channel, and down the Rhone to Massalia. "This island is described as surrounded by the sea at high water, but connected with the mainland by a tract of sand left bare at low water, so as to render it a peninsula to which the tin was carried in wagons.
Page 698 - ... the NOTITIA DIGNITATUM requires also a passing notice in this place, though it can hardly be said to contribute anything to geographical knowledge in the true sense of the word. But it contains a review of the provinces of the empire, as they existed at the time when it was drawn up, after the subdivision of them which had taken place under Diocletian and Constantino, of the details of which we have no informa...
Page 554 - ... written since his time have added notices of certain places situated opposite to each other, not as being at equal distances from the equator, but simply as being on the same meridian a fact which is established by the voyage from one to the other being a straight course before a north or south wind ; while the distances from one place to another have for the most part been reckoned only in a rough and general way, especially those from east to west, not so much from the carelessness of those...
Page 419 - ... to be recommended, on account of the neighbouring pirates, who occupy a place called Nitrias: nor does it furnish any abundance of merchandise. Moreover the station of shipping is far from the land, and cargoes have to be loaded and unloaded in barges. The ruler of the country at the time of which I speak was a king named Ccelobothras.

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