The New Agenda for Global Security: Cooperating for Peace and Beyond

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Stephanie Lawson
Allen & Unwin, Jan 1, 1995 - Law - 217 pages
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This study offers an incisive, sometimes controversial, analysis of Australian Foreign Minister Gareth Evans' vision for peace and security in the post-Cold War era. The text considers basic themes of security, arms control, sovereignty, peacekeeping, sanctions, the United Nations, and the Third World, the idea of good international citizenship, and also broad ethical assumptions and problems, as well as important issues which received only marginal consideration in Evans' book, Co-operating For Peace. The book concludes with a response from Gareth Evans.
  

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Contents

From Collective to Cooperative Security?
19
The Core Assumptions and Presumptions
39
The New Mindset of International Relations? Security
59
Some Critical Reflections
75
Sanctions Enforcement and the Blue Book
89
Cooperating for Peace and Third World Sovereignty
119
Silences of the Blue Book
133
The Ethical Assumptions of the Blue Book
149
Australia and Good International Citizenship
171
A Rejoinder
189
Index
205
Copyright

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Page 82 - The conflict between the West and the Confucian-Islamic states focuses largely, although not exclusively, on nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missiles and other sophisticated means for delivering them, and the guidance, intelligence and other electronic capabilities for achieving that goal. The West promotes non-proliferation as a universal norm and nonproliferation treaties and inspections as
Page 36 - The West in effect is using international institutions, military power and economic resources to run the world in ways that will maintain Western predominance, protect Western interests and promote Western political and economic values.
Page 44 - cooperative security is: ...multi-dimensional in scope and gradualist in temperament; emphasises reassurance rather than deterrence; is inclusive rather than exclusive; is not restrictive in membership; favours multilateralism over bilateralism; does not privilege military solutions over non-military ones; assumes that states are the principal actors in the security system, but accepts that nonstate
Page 82 - means of realizing that norm. It also threatens a variety of sanctions against those who promote the spread of sophisticated weapons and proposes some benefits for those who do not. The attention of the West focuses, naturally, on nations that are actually or potentially hostile to the West.
Page 8 - states are the principal actors in the security system, but accepts that non-state actors may have an important role to play; does not require the creation of formal security institutions, but does not reject them either; and...above all, stresses the value of creating ‘habits of dialogue' on a multilateral basis.¿ The
Page 128 - to use all necessary means to facilitate the departure from Haiti of the military leadership [and] the prompt return of the legitimately elected President'.
Page 76 - actors in the security system, but accepts that non-state actors may have an important role to play; does not require the creation of formal security institutions, but does not reject them either; and which, above all, stresses the value of creating ‘habits of dialogue
Page 53 - shift in public attitudes towards the belief that the defense of the oppressed in the name of morality should prevail over frontiers and legal documents'.¿
Page 81 - In the post-Cold War world the primary objective of arms control is to prevent the development by non-Western societies of military capabilities that could threaten Western interests. The West attempts to do this

References to this book

Gareth Evans
Keith Scott
Limited preview - 1999

About the author (1995)

Stephanie Lawson is Professor of International Relations at the University of East Anglia

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