Doctor at Sea

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House of Stratus, Jan 1, 2001 - Fiction - 162 pages
1 Review
Richard Gordon’s life was moving rapidly towards middle-aged lethargy – or so he felt. Employed as an assistant in general practice – the medical equivalent of a poor curate – and having been ‘persuaded’ that marriage is as much an obligation for a young doctor as celibacy for a priest, Richard sees the rest of his life stretching before him. Losing his nerve, and desperately in need of an antidote, he instead signs on with the Fathom Steamboat Company. What follows is a hilarious tale of nautical diseases and assorted misadventures at sea. Yet he also becomes embroiled in a mystery – what is in the Captain’s stomach remedy? And more to the point, what on earth happened to the previous doctor?
  

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Review: Doctor At Sea (Doctor in the House)

User Review  - Filip Alimpic - Goodreads

Amazing book. Easy reads, but awesome story. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
10
Section 3
21
Section 4
30
Section 5
35
Section 6
46
Section 7
59
Section 8
66
Section 12
98
Section 13
106
Section 14
115
Section 15
124
Section 16
134
Section 17
136
Section 18
143
Section 19
150

Section 9
75
Section 10
82
Section 11
90
Section 20
156
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Richard Gordon is best-known for his hilarious Doctor series books and the long-running television series they inspired. Born in 1921, he qualified as a doctor and went on to work as an anesthetist at the famous St. Bartholomew's Hospital, before a spell as a ship's surgeon and then as assistant editor of the British Medical Journal. In 1952, he left medical practice to take up writing full time and embarked upon the Doctor series, many of which are based on his experiences in the medical profession and are told with the wry wit and candid humor that have become his hallmark. They have proved enduringly successful and have been adapted to both film and TV. His Great Medical Mysteries and Great Medical Discoveries series concern the stranger aspects of the medical profession, while The Private Life series takes a deeper look at individual figures within their specific medical and historical setting. Gordon will, however, always be best known for his comic tone coupled with remarkable powers of observation.

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