Records of the Geological Survey of India, Volumes 5-7 (Google eBook)

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Government of India, 1872 - Geology
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Includes the "Annual report of the Geological Survey of India," 1867-
  

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Page 142 - Indian cosmogonie forms, we may trace an image of congruity through the cloud of exaggeration with which they are invested. We have the elephant then, as at present, the largest of land animals, a fit supporter of the infant world ; in the serpent Asokee, used at the churning of the ocean, we may trace a representative...
Page 134 - Nullah, the richest of all lies entirely within the area occupied by the pseudo-diorite and associated chloritic schists. " Quartz reefs occur in all the rock series above enumerated ; but those lying within the limits of the Soortoor series are the best defined.
Page 29 - Sciences, le 13 mai 1816, sur la possibilité de faire vivre des mollusques fluviatiles dans les eaux salées , et des mollusques marins dans les eaux douces , considérée sous le rapport de la géologie. Des belles expériences de ce savant naturaliste , il résulte « 1.° que les » mollusques fluviatiles périssent très-prompte» ment lorsqu'on les plonge subitement de l'eau » douce, dans l'eau salée au degré de nos mers, >» ou dans des eaux chargées de gaz acide car...
Page 85 - ... filled with the waters of the sea. In the ninth edition (1853), Captain Miller's estimated elevation of 500 feet is adopted instead of the former one ; but the statement regarding the sea inside still remains. In the tenth edition (1868) Captain Miller's estimate of 500 feet, as the height in 1834, is retained ; but it is stated that according to Von Liebig in 1857, both the cone and outer crater were about 1,000 feet high, and in reference to the sea we find the following : — " In some of...
Page 142 - Gariida, with all his attributes, we may detect the gigantic crane of India (Ciconia gigantea) as supplying the origin. In like manner, the Colossochelys would supply a consistent representative of the tortoise that sustained the elephant and the world together. But if we are to suppose that the mythological notion of the tortoise was derived, as a symbol of strength, from some one of those small species which are now known to exist in...
Page 102 - Library. Catalogue of the printed books in the Library of the Society of writers to HM Signet in Scotland. Part I.
Page 143 - ... representative of the tortoise that sustained the elephant and the world together. But if we are to suppose that the mythological notion of the tortoise was derived, as a symbol of strength, from some one of those small species which are now known to exist in India, this congruity of ideas, this harmony of representation would be at once violated ; it would be as legitimate to talk of a rat or a mouse contending with an elephant, as of any known Indian tortoise to do the same in the case of the...
Page 50 - ... saturated with it, the explanation that the Loss is a subaerial deposit, is almost involuntarily pressed upon one's mind. I do not think that by this I am advancing a new idea ; for, — unless I am very much mistaken, — it was my friend Baron Richthofen who came to a similar conclusion during his recent sojourn in Southern China. Yarkand lies about five miles from the river, far away from the hills, in the midst of a well cultivated land, intersected by numerous canals of irrigation ; a land...
Page 91 - Dr. McClelland, writing in 1838,* says : — " It is a volcanic cone raised to the height of from 700 to 800 feet." He gives a sketch showing the figure of the cone, " the upper part of which is quite naked, presenting lines such as were doubtless formed by lava currents descending from the crater to the base, which last is covered with vegetation.
Page 18 - Memoirs of the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom. Figures and Descriptions illustrative of British Organic Remains.

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