Memoirs (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Aug 1, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 880 pages
28 Reviews
Before his spectacular career as General of the Union forces, William Tecumseh Sherman experienced decades of failure and depression. Drifting between the Old South and new West, Sherman witnessed firsthand many of the critical events of early nineteenth-century America: the Mexican War, the gold rush, the banking panics, and the battles with the Plains Indians. It wasn't until his victory at Shiloh, in 1862, that Sherman assumed his legendary place in American history. After Shiloh, Sherman sacked Atlanta and proceeded to burn a trail of destruction that split the Confederacy and ended the war. His strategy forever changed the nature of warfare and earned him eternal infamy throughout the South. Sherman's Memoirs evoke the uncompromising and deeply complex general as well as the turbulent times that transformed America into a world power. This Penguin Classics edition includes a fascinating introduction and notes by Sherman biographer Michael Fellman.


  

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Review: Sherman: Memoirs of General WT Sherman (Library of America #51)

User Review  - Karl F. - Goodreads

Both volumes were read as a resource of the Civil war as well as for the particulars in the life of General Sherman. The American Civil War is crucial background and General Sherman in particular ... Read full review

Review: Sherman: Memoirs of General WT Sherman (Library of America #51)

User Review  - Chris Wolfington - Goodreads

A must read for Civil War buffs and recommended for military buffs. Sherman recounts his life, mostly in the war, and provides his reports to describe his battles. This makes it exceptionally accurate ... Read full review

Contents

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7
VI
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VII
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IX
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XXX
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Copyright

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About the author (2000)

William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator and author. He served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861-65), for which he received recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy as well as criticism for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies that he implemented in conducting total war against the Confederate States. Military historian B. H. Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general." Sherman served under General Ulysses S. Grant in 1862 and 1863 during the campaigns that led to the fall of the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg on the Mississippi River and culminated with the routing of the Confederate armies in the state of Tennessee. In 1864, Sherman succeeded Grant as the Union commander in the western theater of the war. He proceeded to lead his troops to the capture of the city of Atlanta, a military success that contributed to the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln. Sherman's subsequent march through Georgia and the Carolinas further undermined the Confederacy's ability to continue fighting. He accepted the surrender of all the Confederate armies in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida in April 1865. When Grant assumed the U.S. presidency in 1869, Sherman succeeded him as Commanding General of the Army (1869-83). As such, he was responsible for the U.S. Army conduct in the Indian Wars over the next 15 years, in the western United States. He steadfastly refused to be drawn into politics and in 1875 published his Memoirs, one of the best-known firsthand accounts of the Civil War.

Michael Fellman is Professor of History at Simon Fraser University in Canada. He is the author of three previous books on nineteenth-century American history.

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