Rudiments of Chemistry: With Illustrations of the Chemical Phenomena of Daily Life (Google eBook)

Front Cover
William and Robert Chambers, 1836 - Chemistry - 98 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 97 - THE success which has attended the efforts of Messrs Chambers in the business of Popular Instruction, has induced them to undertake the duty of supplying a series of Treatises and School Books, constructed according to the most advanced views of Education, both as a science and an art, and answering in its parts and ultimate general effect to the demands of the age. Their Course will, as far as possible, embody the code and materials of...
Page 20 - Put a tea-spoonful of sulphate of soda into a cup, and dissolve it in hot water ; pour a little cabbage blue into the solution, and put a portion into two glasses, connecting them by a piece of linen or cotton cloth previously moistened in the same solution. On putting one of the wires of the galvanic pole into each glass, the acid accumulates in the one, turning the blue to a red, and the alkali in the other, rendering it green.
Page 98 - ... [Physical Education.] In order that man may possess a vigorous frame of body and its concomitant sound health, without which every species of moral and intellectual excellence is cramped and frustrated, he must be subjected from the moment of birth to such processes of management, and afterwards trained to such habits in food, exercise, cleanliness, and exposure to air, as have been ascertained to conduce to strength and health. [Moral Education.] For the sake of himself and society, he must...
Page 98 - ... following kinds of knowledge : (1) the Surface of the Earth, (Geography); (2) the Structure of the Earth (Geology); (3) the Vegetable Productions of the Earth (Botany); (4) the Animal Creatures of the Earth (Zoology); (5) the Phenomena of the Atmosphere (Meteorology); (6) the Elements of Matter and their Combinations, (Chemistry); (7) the Mechanical Powers and Relations of the Material World (Natural Philosophy); (8) the Science of Measurement (Geometry); (9) the Relation of our Globe to the...
Page v - For the latter every thing is abstract, because the principles he is taught apply to no-f thing that he already knows, and are either soon obliterated from his memory, or. take a wrong direction there. The first, on the contrary, reflects on his own experience all the light that is transmitted, to him ; he sees in his practice the con...
Page 64 - Miz intimately 200 grains of fine sand, and 600 of fine carbonate of potassa ; fuse the mixture in a crucible capable of containing four times as much. Carbonic acid escapes, the silica and potassa combine and produce glass. Pour out the glass, which...
Page 64 - The compound formed in this manner constitutes pure .-i'ii-n soap, having all the detergent properties of common soap ; it is more active than ordinary soap, and leaves a harsh feeling upon the hand. Common silica soap is mixed with a considerable portion of common soap, and occasionally with sand.
Page 10 - Fahrenheit at that place, fiat much greater degrees of cold exist at different parts of our globe in winter, and may be produced artificially, so that the fluid in the stem of the thermometer often descends below that point, and is then said to be at so many degrees below zero. Water, as above mentioned, boils at 212 degrees, but this is only under the common pressure of the atmosphere near the sea's level. By removing a portion of the pressure either by an air-pump or by ascending a height, the...
Page 16 - ... escape of heat, and do not readily communicate the fire to adjacent bodies. Heat is said to radiate when it is emitted from a fire or from the rays of the sun, and affects the atmosphere or substances at a distance from its source. Radiant heat is absorbed when it falls upon bodies having painted or rough surfaces, such as are presented by bricks and other porous solids, by many kinds of stony matter, and numerous animal and vegetable substances, and makes them warmer as it is taken up. But brilliant...
Page 15 - ... state of abstraction or comparative absence of heat. Heat is diffused or communicated by conduction and radiation. When it passes slowly from one portion of matter to another in contact with it, it is said to be conducted; and the process, in scientific language, is termed the conduction of caloric. Metals are the best conductors, then liquids, and lastly gases. Gold, silver, and copper are the best conductors among solids ; glass. bricks, and many stony substances are very bad conductors ; and...

References from web pages

Original Paper Changes in the Methods of Teaching and Learning ...
Microchim. Acta 142, 143152 (2003). DOI 10.1007/s00604-003-0013-5. Original Paper. Changes in the Methods of Teaching and Learning Chemistry ...
www.springerlink.com/ index/ HBAGLXRL3XH6ML6P.pdf

Bibliographic information