Epigraphy and the Greek Historian (Google eBook)

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University of Toronto Press, Sep 20, 2008 - History - 224 pages
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Epigraphy is a method of inferring and analyzing historical data by means of inscriptions found on ancient artifacts such as stones, coins, and statues. It has proven indispensable for archaeologists and classicists, and has considerable potential for the study of ancient history at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Epigraphy and the Greek Historian is a collection of essays that explore various ways in which inscriptions can help students reconstruct and understand Greek History.

In order to engage with the study of epigraphy, this collection is divided into two parts, Athens and Athens from the outside. The contributors maintain the importance of epigraphy, arguing that, in some cases, inscriptions are the only tools we have to recover the local history of places that stand outside the main focus of ancient literary sources, which are often frustratingly Athenocentric. Ideally, the historian uses both inscriptions and literary sources to make plausible inferences and thereby weave together the disconnected threads of the past into a connected and persuasive narrative. Epigraphy and the Greek Historian is a comprehensive examination of epigraphy and a timely resource for students and scholars involved in the study of ancient history.

  

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Contents

Contributors
Abbreviations
Epigraphical Sigla
List of Publications
Introduction
PART ONEAthens
Drakonian Procedure
Hypereides Aristophon and the Settlement of Keos
The Wider Greek World
Theopompos and the Public Documentation of FifthCentury Athens
Horton Hears an Ionian
Epigraphy and the Island of Thera
INDEX OF SOURCES
INDEX OF NAMES
INDEX OF PLACES
GENERAL INDEX

Athenians in Sicily in the Fourth Century BC
IG ii2 1622 and the Collection of Naval Debts in the 340s
The SlaveNames of IG i3 1032 and the Ideology of Slavery at Athens
PHOENIX SUPPLEMENTARY VOLUMES
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Craig Cooper is a professor in the Department of Classics and associate dean of Arts at the University of Winnepeg.

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