The Works of Sir Walter Ralegh, Kt: The life of Sir Walter Ralegh, by William Oldys. The life of Sir Walter Ralegh, by Tho. Birch (Google eBook)

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The University press, 1829 - History, Ancient
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Page 391 - Beg my dead body, which living was denied thee, and either lay it at Sherborne, if the land continue, or in Exeter church, by my father and mother. I can say no more, time and death call me away.
Page 203 - Arvi there are two rivers, Atoica and Caora, and on that branch which is called Caora are a nation of people, whose heads appear not above their shoulders; which, though it may be thought a mere fable, yet for mine own part I am resolved it is true, because every child in the provinces of Arromaia and Canuri affirm the same; they are called Ewaipanoma. They are reported to have their eyes in their shoulders, and their mouths in the middle of their breasts...
Page 445 - ... purse ; resolve that no man is wise or safe, but he that is honest. Serve God; let him be the Author of all thy actions; commend all thy...
Page 113 - ... that landed, being very many in number, were, notwithstanding, broken, slain, and taken; and so sent from village to village, coupled in halters to be shipped into England, where Her Majesty, of her princely and invincible disposition disdaining to put them to death, and scorning either to retain, or...
Page 348 - And therefore, I think, the best course is, to set " it at liberty, and leave every man free, which is the desire
Page 108 - Lord Charles Howard, Admiral of England, been lost in the year 1588, if he had not been better advised than a great many malignant fools were, that found fault with his demeanour. The Spaniards had an army aboard them, and he had none ; they had more ships than he had, and of higher building and charging; so that, had he entangled himself with those great and powerful vessels, he had greatly endangered this kingdom of England.
Page 54 - In witness whereof we have caused these our letters to be made patents. Witness ourself, at Westminster, the twelfth day of March, in the ninth year of our reign of England, France, and Ireland, and of Scotland the five and fortieth.
Page 646 - Then being asked which way he would lay himself on the block, he answered, " So the heart be right, it is no matter which way the head lies.
Page 127 - In that Faery Queene I meane glory in my generall intention, but in my particular I conceive the most excellent and glorious person of our soveraine the Queene, and her kingdome in Faery Land.
Page 223 - Inga, he would yield to her Majesty by composition so many hundred thousand pounds yearly as should both defend all enemies abroad, and defray all expenses at home; and that he would besides pay a garrison of three or four thousand soldiers very royally to defend him against other nations.

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