Great Lakes Shipwrecks & Survivals (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1977 - History - 384 pages
6 Reviews
In this breathtaking chronicle of the most spectacular shipwrecks and survivals on the Great Lakes, William Ratigan re-creates vivid scenes of high courage and screaming panic from which no reader can turn away.

Included in this striking catalog of catastrophes and Flying Dutchmen are the magnificent excursion liner Eastland, which capsized at her pier in the Chicago River, drowning 835 people within clutching distance of busy downtown streets; the shipwrecked steel freighter Mataafa, which dumped its crew into freezing waters while the snowbound town of Duluth looked on; the dark Sunday in November 1913 when Lake Huron swallowed eight long ships without a man surviving to tell the tale; and the bitter November of 1958 when the Bradley went down in Lake Michigan during one of the greatest killer storms on the freshwater seas. An entire section is dedicated to the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald -- the most famous maritime loss in modern times -- in Lake Superior in 1975.

Chilling watercolor illustrations, photographs, maps, and news clippings accentuate Ratigan's compelling and dramatic storytelling. Sailors, historians, and general readers alike will be swept away by these unforgettable tales of tragedy and heroism.
  

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Review: Great Lakes Shipwrecks & Survivals

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

Really great read for anyone interested in the Great Lakes, history, boating (or, like me, all three). Ratigan's style is both flowery and epic -- he quickly had me wanting to say "aarr!" at the end ... Read full review

Review: Great Lakes Shipwrecks & Survivals

User Review  - uh8myzen - Goodreads

Anyone with even a passing interest in nautical life and history should love this book. Read full review

Contents

III
13
IV
14
V
16
VI
19
VII
23
VIII
26
IX
30
X
33
XXXVIII
218
XXXIX
224
XL
226
XLI
235
XLIII
237
XLIV
239
XLV
243
XLVI
250

XI
36
XII
43
XIII
49
XIV
60
XV
68
XVI
91
XVII
93
XVIII
95
XIX
98
XX
102
XXI
108
XXII
114
XXIII
117
XXIV
123
XXV
136
XXVI
165
XXVIII
167
XXIX
170
XXX
177
XXXI
182
XXXII
186
XXXIII
193
XXXIV
201
XXXV
205
XXXVI
211
XXXVII
215
XLVII
257
XLVIII
261
XLIX
269
L
273
LI
281
LII
283
LIII
287
LIV
292
LV
303
LVI
313
LVII
315
LVIII
317
LIX
319
LX
322
LXI
327
LXII
329
LXIII
331
LXIV
337
LXV
340
LXVI
344
LXVII
345
LXVIII
347
LXIX
352
LXX
378
Copyright

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Page 5 - O wha is this has don this deid, This ill deid don to me, To send me out this time o' the yeir, To sail upon the se!
Page 5 - To send me out this time o' the yeir, To sail upon the se ! " Mak hast, mak haste, my mirry men all, Our guid schip sails the morne :" " O say na sae, my master deir, For I feir a deadlie storme. " Late late yestreen I saw the new moone, Wi...
Page 13 - State, the steamer, and the beech canoe ; they are swept by Borean and dismasting blasts as direful as any that lash the salted wave ; they know what shipwrecks are, for out of sight of land, however inland, they have drowned full many a midnight ship with all its shrieking crew.

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About the author (1977)

(1910 1984) Six generations of William Ratigan's family have lived in Michigan, a fact that has inspired his novels and biographies of the Great Lakes region. His father went on the Lakes at age twelve and worked up to steamboat engineer, with fresh- and salt-water licenses. The author himself once acted as dockmaster for a season at his home port of Charlevoix Formerly a NBC network news director and supervisor of war correspondents in the PTO, he covered the Bradley shipwreck for the mass media and was consultant to the Smithsonian Institution on technical development of Great Lakes craft. In connection with his NBC network newsroom services, he carried a card as journalism instructor for UCLA. He was proud of having quarterbacked and captained the University of Chattanooga's all-Dixie Conference football team and of being an adopted chief of the Ottawa tribe, with the name of Opwa-nan iia Kanotong, Interpreter of Dreams.

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