History of the Supreme Court of the United States (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. H. Kerr, 1912 - 823 pages
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Contents

I
5
II
13
III
48
IV
73
V
135
VI
197
VII
228
VIII
258
XI
391
XII
440
XIII
483
XIV
528
XV
578
XVI
618
XVII
661
XVIII
695

IX
283
X
355

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 83 - That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural inherent and unalienable rights, amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 507 - What, then, is the effect of the repealing act upon the case before us? We cannot doubt as to this. Without jurisdiction the court cannot proceed at all in any cause. Jurisdiction is power to declare the law, and when it ceases to exist, the only function remaining to the court is that of announcing the fact and dismissing the cause. And this is not less clear upon authority than upon principle.
Page 525 - Oyez! All persons having business before the Honorable, the Supreme Court of the United States, are admonished to draw near and give their attention, for the Court is now sitting. God save the United States and this Honorable Court.
Page 470 - They had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations; and so far inferior, that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect; and that the Negro might justly and lawfully be reduced to slavery.
Page 244 - That the people have an original right to establish for their future government such principles as, in their opinion, shall most conduce to their own happiness, is the basis on which the whole American fabric has been erected. The exercise of this original right is a very great exertion, nor can it nor ought it to be frequently repeated.
Page 266 - An opinion is huddled up in conclave, perhaps by a majority of one, delivered as if unanimous, and with the silent acquiescence of lazy or timid associates, by a crafty chief judge, who sophisticates the law to his mind, by the turn of his own reasoning.
Page 475 - Our judges are as honest as other men, and not more so. They have, with others, the same passions for party, for power, and the privilege of their corps. Their maxim is, "boni judicis est ampliare jurisdictionem...
Page 266 - to coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin,' and it also declares that 'no State shall coin money, emit bills of credit, or make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts.
Page 281 - That a final judgment or decree in any suit, in the highest court of law or equity of a State in which a decision in the suit could be had...
Page 506 - We are not at liberty to inquire into the motives of the legislature. We can only examine into its power under the constitution ; and the power to make exceptions to the appellate jurisdiction of this court is given by express words.

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