Distributed Problem-based Learning: A Study of Instructional Design Models, Methods and Tools Designers Use to Create Collaborative and Interactive Learning Environments

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ProQuest, 2007 - 159 pages
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Distributed problem-based learning (dPBL) is an emerging interactive online methodology and it is necessary for instructional designers who want to develop this approach to understand the dPBL models and methods that experienced designers are using. This phenomenological study examined the instructional design (ID) models and processes experienced designers used to develop dPBL. The study explored dPBL models, methods, and computer-mediated communication tools (CMC) that designers use to create collaborative and interactive learning environments. Resulting from the study is a best practices listing which summarizes 12 recommendations that experienced designers believed to be the most critical for dPBL environments. Ten experienced dPBL designers from seven countries participated in the qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured telephone interviews in order to provide information about each individual's experiences using ID and designing dPBL. Results of the study suggest that even though 7 out of the 10 experienced designers of dPBL reported they did not follow any particular ID model or steps, they did report implementing some of the major ID processes. The dPBL models, blended models and processes that designers follow are described, including the importance of social communication in dPBL. Nine CMC tools are being used to create collaborative and interactive dPBL environments, with standard products such as BlackboardRTM and WebCTRTM being the most popular CMC tools that dPBL designers use. The 12 best practices recommendations for designing dPBL that are described are consistent with the themes that the experienced designers presented throughout the study.
  

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Contents

List of Tables
5
LITERATURE REVIEW
11
ID Models Recommended by Gustafson and Branch
41
Dick and Carey systematic design model
44
Components of the instructional design plan by Morrison Ross Kemp
51
METHODOLOGY
55
Research and Interview Questions
63
RESULTS
68
Required Not Required
90
Value of Social Communication in dPBL
93
CMC Tools Used in dPBL
97
Advantages and Limitations of Asynchronous CMC Tools
99
Advantages and Limitations of Synchronous CMC Tools
102
Best Practices for dPBL
105
Ideal Group Size
107
Ideal Course Length
110

Participant Demographics
70
Instructional Design Processes Used in dPBL Design
74
SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
123
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