The Bible

Front Cover
CUP Archive, Aug 30, 1991 - Literary Criticism - 141 pages
3 Reviews
This study focuses on the Bible as a landmark of literature, showing both how it has influenced writers through the ages and how it in turn has been influenced by contemporary literature. It describes what is known about the historical context of the documents, the changes of interpretation they have undergone over the centuries, and the problems and influence of various translations, ranging from Tyndale to the Good News Bible.
  

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I HAD MINE SIGNED MY MOSES!! FUCK YEAH!!!! GO JESUS!!

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Contents

The contents of the Bible
18
Leading themes of the Bible
43
Interpretation of the Bible
80
The Bible and literature
109
Guide to further reading
139
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1991)

Stephen Prickett is Regius Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Glasgow and Honorary Professor at the University of Kent at Canterbury, UK. He has previously held positions at Duke University, Baylor University, the Australian National University in Canberra, Smith College, Massachusetts, The University of Minnesota, Aarhus University, Denmark, and the National University of Singapore. He is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, former Chairman of the UK Higher Education Foundation, former President of the European Society for the Study of Literature and Theology and President of the George MacDonald Society.

Robert Barnes Educated at the universities of Grenoble, Oxford and Reading, Robert taught English & Drama in Sussex, London, Oxford and Cambridge for fifteen years. During this time he also wrote and directed a number of children's plays and musicals, one of which was reviewed in The Times Educational Supplement. Having held posts including Housemaster, Director of Studies, Academic Director and Deputy Head, Robert left the classroom for Los Angeles, where he wrote two screenplays. Returning to London, he managed a Mayfair art gallery before being selected for a writing course at The Guardian, which led to a job in advertising, working for an Omnicom agency. After a spell in marketing, running a portfolio of European accounts, he went freelance and worked as a communications consultant for many blue-chip clients. He won the D&AD Yellow Pencil in the category 'Writing for Design'. In 2002 he took on responsibility as Principal and Senior Partner of the independent school his father founded in 1955. He was appointed Headmaster in 2004. In 2006 he successfully negotiated the sale of the school to a large educational charity, The Girls' Day School Trust. In 2009 Robert left the school to pursue his writing career full time.