Trim: Its Ecclesiastical Ruins, Its Castle, Etc. : Together with a Collection of Documents Not Hitherto Published, and Notes of Trim and Its Environs for Past Two Centuries (Google eBook)

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Printed at the Office of the Irish Builder, 1886 - Christian antiquities - 40 pages
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Page 13 - Highness, and all leased out for years or in fee farm to several farmers ; and great gain reaped out of them above the rent which your Majesty receiveth. No Parson or Vicar resident upon any of them, and a very simple or sorry curate, for the most part, appointed to serve...
Page 13 - He doth live now in these parts, where he hath two bishopricks: but there is no divine service or sermon to be heard within either of his dioceses. His lordship might have saved us this labour of inquiry, touching matters ecclesiastical, if he had been as careful to see the churches repaired and supplied with good incumbents, as he is diligent in visiting his barbarous clergy, to make benefit out of their insufficiency, according to the proverb, which is common in the mouth of one of our great bishops...
Page 13 - ... abolished by your Majesty ; no one house standing for any of them to dwell in. In many places, the very walls of the churches down, very few chancels covered, windows and doors ruined or spoiled.
Page 13 - Majesty receiveth ; no parson or vicar resident upon any of them, and a very simple, or sorry curate, for the most part, appointed to serve them, among which number of curates, only 18 were found able to speak English ; the rest Irish priests, or rather Irish rogues, having very little Latin, less learning, or civility.
Page 30 - It shall be lawful," says one of these statutes (5 Ed. IV) "to all manner of men that find any thieves robbing by day or by night, or going or coming to rob or steal, having no faithful man of good name in their company, in English apparel...
Page 9 - AD 433. When Patrick, in his holy navigation, came to Ireland, he left St. Loman at the mouth of the Boyne, to take care of his boat forty days and forty nights ; and then he (Loman) waited another forty, out of obedience to Patrick. Then, according to the order of his Master (the Lord being his pilot), he came in his boat against the stream, as far as the ford of Trim, near the fort of Feidlimid [Felimy], son of Loiguire [Leary].
Page 15 - Chalmers, touching Mr James Carey, and of his fitness and abilities to preach the word, both in English and Irish, and upon consideration had thereof, and of the usefulness of gifts in order to the conversion of the poore ignorant natives, it is thought fit and ordered, that the said Mr...
Page 30 - It was made lawful to cut off their heads, (a humane process,) " and of any head so cut in the county of Meath, that the cutter of the said head, and his ayders there to him, cause the said head, so cut, to be brought to the portreeve of the town of Trim, and the portreeve...
Page 7 - ... John Plunket, Chief Justice of the Queen's Bench, dying in 1583, Her Majesty resolved to appoint for his successor her trusty and well-beloved servant, Sir Lucas Dillon, her Chief Baron, as a personage, whom for his very good and faithful service, and for his good deserts and sufficiency every way, she thought not only worthy of that place, but of a better; yet, upon good consideration had, and finding by himself that he was able to do her better service in the place he then had, than if he had...

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