Armadale

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Apr 1, 2004 - Fiction - 672 pages
23 Reviews
1866. A close friend of Charles Dickens, Collins is one of the most readable of the Victorian novelists and some critics credit him with the invention of Sensation/Detective novel. Originally serialized in The Cornhill, in Armadale the two heroes of the novel, Ozias Midwinter and Allan Armadale, are born under a curse since Midwinter's father had murdered Armadale's father. On his death bed, Midwinter's father warns that if these two sons ever meet, tragedy will occur. Midwinter learns the story and is uncertain whether to leave Allan or to work at changing their fate. The novel also features a doctor who is running a clandestine abortion clinic. When that operation is shut down by the police, he opens a private sanitarium for monetary gain. When the local ladies come to tour the facilities he espouses a system of liberal care, when in actuality the building is laid out with an intricate system of pipes that allow him to keep his patients continually sedated. At the novel's end, the doctor is found to be planning a murder using those pipes. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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Review: Armadale

User Review  - Bruce - Goodreads

Having greatly enjoyed Wilkie Collins' novels The Woman in White and The Moonstone, I turned to Armadale with great anticipation, and baggy and imperfect as it is, it did not disappoint. A more ... Read full review

Review: Armadale

User Review  - DesertSlug - Goodreads

This is a solid Wilkie Collins book, but not his best. Simply put, it's a bit long and redundant - a result of his being paid by the word, I suspect. But the story is fun, the characters enjoyable ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Born in London, the son of artist William Collins, Wilkie Collins was educated at Highbury and spent four years in Italy with his parents. Upon his return to England, he worked first in business and then law, but eventually turned to literature. Collins created the crime novel of intricate plot and baffling mystery. The Woman in White (1860) was his first success, followed in 1863 by his masterpiece The Moonstone. Both novels demonstrate Collins' fascination with psychological portraiture and sensationalistic complication. Other books include The Haunted Hotel (1875), Antonia (1850), and Heart and Science (1883). Collins was a close friend of Charles Dickens and collaborated with him. His mastery of plot influenced Dickens, and he was influenced by Dickens's mastery of character.

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