The Works of Jonathan Swift: Accurately Revised in Twelve Volumes, Adorned with Copper-plates. With Some Account of the Author's Life and Notes, Historical and Explanatory, Volume 11 (Google eBook)

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C. Bathurst, 1755
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Page 325 - And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.
Page 20 - With regard to the former, I demand whether I have not as good a title to laugh, as men have to be ridiculous, and to expose vice, as another hath to be vicious.
Page 324 - And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.
Page 58 - Exactly at eight the mother came up, and discovered, by the redness of her face, that supper was not far off. It was twice as large as the dinner, and my persecution doubled in proportion. I desired at my...
Page 265 - No, faith, my lord ; I like your wine, and I won't put a churl upon a gentleman ; your honour's claret is good enough for me.
Page 309 - And all this is highly reasonable : for faith is an entire dependence upon the truth, the power, the justice, and the mercy of God ; which dependence will certainly incline us to obey him in all things.
Page 59 - This last piece of civility had like to have cost me dear, being once or twice in danger of my neck by leaping over his ditches, and at last forced to alight in the dirt, when my horse, having slipped his bridle, ran away, and took us up more than an hour to recover him again.
Page 72 - Daniel the historian, and several others who writ later; but being men of the Court, and affecting the phrases then in fashion, they are often either not to be understood, or appear perfectly ridiculous.
Page 56 - ... is employed in laying chains and fetters upon us, in debarring us of our wishes, and in crossing our most reasonable desires and inclinations.
Page 56 - As soon as I entered the parlour, they put me into the great chair that stood close by a huge fire, and kept me there by force until I was almost stifled.

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