We the students: Supreme Court decisions for and about students

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CQ Press, 2000 - Education - 271 pages
2 Reviews
Filled with real-life examples and exercises, We the Students helps students gain a greater understanding of constitutional law in an interesting and thought-provoking way.

Designed for students and teachers in regular and A.P. social studies, history, journalism, constitutional law, and government classes, We the Students is full of interesting examples and exercises to provide students with a greater understanding of constitutional law in a way in which they can relate and enjoy.

Specific cases covered include:
-- Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District No. 21
-- Melton v. Young
-- Bethel School District v. Fraser
-- Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier
-- Engel v. Vitale
-- Lee v. Weisman
-- New Jersey v. T.L.O.
-- Vernonia School District v. Acton
-- Goss v. Lopez
-- Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
-- Plus 16 additional key cases.

Designed for the Library and the Classroom:
-- Suggested activities offer innovative ideasfor team projects
-- Historical material provides valuable context and points of reference
-- Glossary definitions clarify fundamental concepts and terms
-- Biographies of Justices introduce the men and women who shape our laws.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - librarybrandy - LibraryThing

An excellent book for classrooms or research. Well-organized, current, and relevant, and includes the actual text (edited for brevity/clarity) of the decisions of the Supreme Court, and in most cases ... Read full review

Review: We the Students: Supreme Court Cases for and about Students

User Review  - Fenixbird SandS - Goodreads

Wonderful discussion of case law (Court rulings) impacting a specified area of civil rights as related to the classroom..including freedom of speech implications! [recommended to me by my student teacher mentor) Read full review

Contents

THE CONSTITUTION AND THE COURTS OF
1
SHOULD PUBLIC SCHOOLS GET RELIGION?
78
SEARCHES
124
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Raskin is a professor of constitutional law at American University.