OUR COUNTRY. A HOUSEHOLD HISTORY FOR ALL READERS FROM THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA TO THE PRESENT TIME (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1878
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Contents

Events on Lake Champlain 1254Events on Lake Ontario 1255Expedition against Montreal
1256
Jackson Subdues them 1261Naval Events on the Ocean 1262Cruise of the Essex 1262
1262
deGrace 1267Norfolk Threatened 1267The British Repulsed 1268Cruelties at Hampton
1269
Attack on Oswego 1275Capture of Fort Erie 1275Battle of Chippewa
1276
Niagara Falls 1279Attack on Fort Erie 1280A Successful Sortie 1281The Americans
1283
1289Their Doings on the Penobscot
1290
Battle at Bladensburg 1293Flight of Civil Officers 1293Mrs Madison 1294Destruction
1296
Change in the Theatre of Operations
1302
CHAPTER XV
1303
Orleans 1307Defeat and Retreat of the British 1307Honors to Jackson 1308The General
1311
CHAPTER XVI
1317
Jackson in Florida 1322Doings at Pensacola 1322Florida Added to the Union 1323
1323
CHAPTER XVII
1329
with Foreign Government 1340Indemnities Settled 1340Commercial Treaties 1340New
1341
General Harrison Elected President 1345Divorce of Banks and State 1345Harrisons
1348
of Texas 1355Preparations for War 1355Bargain with Santa Anna and its Results 1355
1355
A Mexican Force in Texas 1357Attack on Fort Brown 1358Battles of Palo Alto
1361
CHAPTER XX
1368
Gordo 1369Flight of Santa Anna 1369Capture of Jalapa Perote and Pueblo 1370A
1373
California Seeks Admission into the Union 1378Violent Debates on the Subject of Slavery
1379
Kossuth and his Cause 1384Disputes about Fisheries 1385Relations with Japan 1385
1385
CHAPTER I
1395
President Buchanans Course Foreshadowed 1400Civil War in Kansas and Civil Government
1406
at Charleston 1411Disruption of the Democratic Party 1413Incidents of the Plan 1413
1413
CHAPTER III
1419
Desires for a Royal Government and Aristocratic Privileges 1421Early Preparations
1425
Ordinance of Secession Adopted 1431Public Excitement 1431Signing the Ordinance
1432
its Tone and Reception 1434The AttorneyGenerals Opinion 1434Movements of
1438
Interior Department 1443Flight of Secretary Floyd 1443Cabinet Changes 1443South
1444
Southern Confederate Government
1452
Adjournment of the Montgomery Convention 1455Principles of the New Government
1464
Siege of Fort Sumter 1467Incidents of the Struggle 1468Evacuation of the Fort 1469
1469
Joyful Feelings in Charleston 1470Gratitude of the Loyal People Displayed 1470Honors
1476
President and Maryland Secessionists 1485Prompt and Efficient Action of General Wool
1485
Sewalls Point 1492Loyalty in Western Virginia 1492Action of the Secessionists 1492
1492
Conventions 1492Creation and Admission of a New State 1493Troops from Beyond
1498
Mitchels Raid into Alabama 1567Recovered Territory 1567Raid upon a Railway 1568
1568
Capture of Memphis 1569Capture of New Berne and Fort Macon 1569Events on the Coast
1573
tions 1578Evacuation of Manassas 1579Promenade of the Union Army 1579McClel
1581
Battle at Fair Oaks 1587Stuarts Raid
1589
Hill 1592The Army at Harrisons Landing 1593 Army of Virginia 1593Battle
1595
Flank Movement 1595Battles at Groveton Bulls Run and Chantilly 1595Call for Volun
1598
CHAPTER XVIII
1604
Operations in Arkansas and Louisiana 1608Battle at Murfreesboro 1610Emancipation
1613
Investment and Siege of Vicksburg p 1616Galveston 1617Banks in Louisiana 1617
1617
erates Abroad 1622Davis Recognized by the Pope 1622Napoleon Mexico and the Confed
1624
CHAPTER XX
1629
Raid in Western Virginia 1633Rosecrans and Bragg in Tennessee 1634Streights Great
1635
Battle at Wauhatchie 1637The Mule Charge 1637Events in East Tennessee 1638Battle
1640
into Missouri 1645Struggle for Louisiana 1645Grant in New Orleans 1646Designs
1647
Good Signs 1647Grant LieutenantGeneral 1647Campaign of 1864 1648Shermans Raid
1651
Cavalry Operations against Richmond 1656Campaign of the Army of the Potomac Begun
1657
Operations between Petersburg and Richmond 1657Kantzs Raid 1658Struggles of Grant
1664
North Carolina 1668Invasion of Tennessee 1669Hoods Defeats and Escape 1670Con
1675
Panic in Richmond 1680Flight of the Confederate Government 1681Richmond on Fire
1681
CHAPTER XXV
1690
CHAPTER XXVI
1702
ment 1703Character of the President 1703Justice for the Freedmen 1704Motives
1709
Reinstated 1715Johnson against Grant 1715 Reconstruction Acts 1715A Highhanded
1720
CHAPTER XXVIII
1726
Banking and Currency 1727Suspension and Resumption of Specie Payments 1727Proposed
1736
The Panic 1741Indians and Indian Wars 1742The Modocs 1742Cheap Transportation
1744
Subject Presented to Congress 1750Action of Congress 1750Commissioners Appointed
1752
Action of the Government 1754Medals Authorized 1754Exhibition Buildings and their
1760
Lawlessness in the South 1763Threatened Trouble there Provided Against 1764The Presi
1773
Products 1775Mineral Wealth 1778Beginning of Manufactures 1779Early Industries
1783
Declaration of Independence
1789
Articles of Confederation
1797
The National Constitution
1806
Washingtons Farewell Address
1833
Index
1847

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Page 1597 - And shook it forth with a royal will. ' Shoot, if you must, this old gray head, But spare your country's flag,
Page 1846 - I may have committed many errors. Whatever they may be, I fervently beseech the Almighty to avert or mitigate the evils to which they may tend. I shall also carry with me the hope that my country will never cease to view them with indulgence...
Page 1800 - The taxes for paying that proportion shall be laid and levied by the authority and direction of the legislatures of the several States within the time agreed upon by the United States in Congress assembled.
Page 1684 - April 9, 1865 GENERAL: I received your note of this morning on the picket-line whither I had come to meet you and ascertain definitely what terms were embraced in your proposal of yesterday with reference to the surrender of this army. I now request an interview in accordance with the offer contained in your letter of yesterday for that purpose.
Page 1461 - If there be an object to hurry any of you in hot haste to a step which you would never take deliberately, that object will be frustrated by taking time, but no good object can be frustrated by it. Such of you as are now dissatisfied still have the old Constitution unimpaired, and, on the sensitive point, the laws of your own framing under it ; while the new Administration will have no immediate power, if it would, to change either.
Page 1431 - Constitution of the United States of America was ratified, and also all acts and parts of acts of the General Assembly of this State ratifying amendments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed, and that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved.
Page 1457 - A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of WASHINGTON. He never would have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him, and...
Page 1460 - I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so; and I have no inclination to do so.
Page 1415 - That the normal condition of all the territory of the United States is that of freedom...
Page 1714 - Resolved, That Andrew Johnson, President of the United States be impeached of high crimes and misdemeanors.

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