History of the Hartford Convention: With a Review of the Policy of the United States Government which Led to the War of 1812 (Google eBook)

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N. & J. White, 1833 - Hartford Convention - 447 pages
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Page 442 - State will thenceforth hold themselves absolved from all further obligation to maintain or preserve their political connection with the people of the other States, and will forthwith proceed to organize a separate Government, and do all other acts and things which sovereign and independent States may of right do.
Page 22 - In place of that noble love of liberty and republican government which carried us triumphantly through the war, an Anglican monarchical and aristocratical party has sprung up, whose avowed object is to draw over us the substance, as they have already done the forms, of the British government.
Page 143 - We behold, in fine, on the side of Great Britain a state of war against the United States, and on the side of the United States a state of peace toward Great Britain.
Page 12 - What signify a few lives lost in a century or two ? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
Page 440 - State ; but it shall be the duty of the legislature to adopt such measures and pass such acts as may be necessary to give full effect to this ordinance, and to prevent the enforcement and arrest the operation of the said acts and parts of acts of the Congress of the United States within the limits of this State...
Page 355 - Whenever it shall appear that these causes are radical and permanent, a separation by equitable arrangement will be preferable to an alliance by constraint among nominal friends, but real enemies, inflamed by mutual hatred and jealousy, and inviting by intestine divisions contempt and aggression from abroad.
Page 215 - An act to interdict the commercial intercourse between the United States and Great Britain and France and their dependencies, and for other purposes...
Page 152 - ... lead to a loss of national character and independence, feel no hesitation in advising resistance by force, in which the Americans of the present day, will prove to the enemy and to the world, that we have not only inherited that liberty which our fathers gave us, but also the WILL and POWER to maintain it. Relying on the patriotism of the nation, and confidently trusting that the Lord of Hosts will go with us to battle in a righteous cause, and crown our efforts with success your committee...
Page 441 - Legislature excepted) shall, within such time, and in such manner as the Legislature shall prescribe, take an oath, well and truly to obey, execute and enforce this Ordinance, and such act or acts of the Legislature, as may be passed in pursuance thereof, according to the true intent and meaning of the same; and on the neglect or omission of any such person or persons so to do, his or their office or offices, shall be forthwith vacated, and shall be filled up, as if such person or persons were dead...
Page 42 - These rogues set out with stealing the people's good opinion, and then steal from them the right of withdrawing it, by contriving laws and associations against the power of the people themselves. Our part of the country is in considerable fermentation, on what they suspect to be a recent roguery of this kind. They say that while all hands were below deck mending sails, splicing ropes, and every one at his own business, and the captain in his cabin attending to his log-book and chart, a rogue of a...

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