Cities without suburbs

Front Cover
Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 1995 - Business & Economics - 152 pages
3 Reviews
Cities without Suburbs, first published in 1993, has become an influential analysis of America's cities among city planners, scholars, and citizens alike. In it, David Rusk, the former mayor of Albuquerque, argues that America must end the isolation of the central city from its suburbs in order to attack its urban problems. The second edition not only employs updated census data available since publication of the first edition, but it provides more precise information about population, income, and racial trends in central cities. Updated case studies of metropolitan reforms are based on Rusk's direct involvement as a consultant in over fifty metro areas since the publication of the first edition.

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Review: Cities Without Suburbs

User Review  - Mjackman - Goodreads

I find Rusk a bit didactic and academic, but his points are all well-made. After reading James Howard Kuntsler, Rusk seems all the drier. Read full review

Review: Cities Without Suburbs

User Review  - Doron - Goodreads

Definitely ruffles your feathers if nothing else. Read full review

Contents

Lessons from Urban America
5
Almost all metro areas have grown
12
Elastic cities capture suburban growth
20
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

David Rusk was the mayor of Albuquerque from 1977 to 1981.