Geronimo: The Man, His Time, His Place

Front Cover
University of Oklahoma Press, 1982 - History - 500 pages
10 Reviews

On September 5, 1886, the entire nation rejoiced as the news flashed from the Southwest that the Apache war leader Geronimo had surrendered to Brigadier General Nelson A. Miles. With Geronimo, at the time of his surrender, were Chief Naiche (the son of the great Cochise), sixteen other warriors, fourteen women, and six children. It had taken a force of 5,000 regular army troops and a series of false promises to "capture" the band.

Yet the surrender that day was not the end of the story of the Apaches associated with Geronimo. Besides his small band, 394 of his tribesmen, including his wife and children, were rounded up, loaded into railroad cars, and shipped to Florida. For more than twenty years Geronimo's people were kept in captivity at Fort Pickens, Florida; Mount Vernon Barracks, Alabama; and finally Fort Sill, Oklahoma. They never gave up hope of returning to their mountain home in Arizona and New Mexico, even as their numbers were reduced by starvation and disease and their children were taken from them to be sent to the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
2
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Geronimo: The Man, His Time, His Place

User Review  - Rena Jane - Goodreads

A beautiful, fair and dignified biography of one of the most famous of Indian chiefs. Must read for lovers of southwestern history. Read full review

Review: Geronimo: The Man, His Time, His Place

User Review  - Goodreads

A beautiful, fair and dignified biography of one of the most famous of Indian chiefs. Must read for lovers of southwestern history. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
Goyahkla the Child
7
Geronimo in 1884 Page vi
14
Hoopandpole game
20
Adult Responsibilities
27
Mexicans and Americans
41
Too Many White Men
59
Dancers impersonating the Mountain Spirits
75
Peace with Suspicion on Turkey Creek
220
Huera
232
History Repeats Itself for Geronimo
243
Kaahteney and family 218
247
Hostiles camp at Canon de los Embudos
253
Geronimo Brings Disaster to His People
264
Surrender conference
267
This Is the Fourth Time I Have Surrendered
281

Washington Has a Policy
80
Geronimo Is Branded a Renegade
95
Naiche
100
Victorio
108
A Pattern of Breakouts Is Set
115
The Bands Gather in the Sierra Madre
134
Site of Tuppers attack
148
Life in the Sierra Madre
156
Cerrito Mata Ortiz
162
The Sanctuary Is Invaded
172
Mickey Free
176
Back to the Reservation
193
Apache family at wickiup
211
Nana
217
Gillee with his wife Tzeston Page
219
Fort Bowie
294
All Trails Lead to Prison
299
Prisoners on railway embankment
307
The Apaches Settle Down as Prisoners
313
Apache students at Carlisle
320
Grave of Shegha at Pensacola
333
Life at Mount Vernon Barracks
336
Geronimo at Mount Vernon Barracks
351
The Prisoners Are Brought to Fort Sill Page
358
Apache wickiup at Fort Sill
366
Geronimo Is Seen as a Person
379
Eva Geronimo age nine
385
Geronimo on Exhibition
400
Geronimo Finds His Powers in Conflict
428
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1982)

Angie Debo was reared in a pioneer community, at Marshall, Oklahoma, where it has been her privilege to know from childhood the folkways of the Indians and the traditions of the western settlers. A member of her community high school's first graduating class, she later attended the University of Oklahoma, where she was a Phi Beta Kappa, and took her B.A. and later her Ph.D. degree; she received her master's degree from the University of Chicago. Her education was combined with intervals of teaching in country schools, starting at the age of sixteen.Miss Debo's distinguished reputation as a regional scholar has been enhanced by her book, The Rise and. Fall of the Choctaw Republic, which won the John H. Dunning prize of the American Historical Society for the best book submitted in the field of United States history in 1934, and for her later, book, And Still the Waters Run. She has been a teacher in schools and colleges both in Oklahoma and Texas and was curator of the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in Canyon, Texas. More recently she has been state director of the Federal Writers' Project in Oklahoma, in which capacity she edited Oklahoma: A Guide to the Sooner State for the American Guide Series.

Bibliographic information