Asia in the Making of Europe, Volume II: A Century of Wonder. Book 3: The Scholarly Disciplines, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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University of Chicago Press, Jan 15, 2010 - History - 440 pages
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Praised for its scope and depth, Asia in the Making of Europe is the first comprehensive study of Asian influences on Western culture. For volumes I and II, the author has sifted through virtually every European reference to Asia published in the sixteenth-century; he surveys a vast array of writings describing Asian life and society, the images of Asia that emerge from those writings, and, in turn, the reflections of those images in European literature and art. This monumental achievement reveals profound and pervasive influences of Asian societies on developing Western culture; in doing so, it provides a perspective necessary for a balanced view of world history.

Volume I: The Century of Discovery brings together "everything that a European could know of India, Southeast Asia, China, and Japan, from printed books, missionary reports, traders' accounts and maps" (The New York Review of Books). Volume II: A Century of Wonder examines the influence of that vast new body of information about Asia on the arts, institutions, literatures, and ideas of sixteenth-century Europe.
  

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Contents

I
396
II
398
IV
401
V
408
VI
416
VII
422
VIII
428
IX
447
XVI
493
XVII
502
XIX
510
XXI
519
XXII
526
XXIII
545
XXIV
557
XXV
568

XI
449
XII
461
XIII
476
XIV
491
XXVI
582
XXVII
736
Copyright

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Page 686 - Tractado | de las Drogas, y medicinas de las Indias Orientales, con sus Plantas debuxadas al | biuo por Christoual Acosta medi- | co y cirujano que las vio | ocularmente.
Page 416 - ... Our age today is doing things of which antiquity did not dream. . . . Ocean has been crossed by the prowess of our navigators, and new islands found. The far recesses of India lie revealed. The continent of the West, the so-called New World, unknown to our forefathers, has in great part become known. In all this, and in what pertains to astronomy, Plato, Aristotle, and the old philosophers made progress, and Ptolemy added a great deal more.
Page 709 - Seas likewise universally nauigable, without any naturall anoyance to hinder the same ; whereby appeares that from England there is a short and speedie Passage into the South Seas to China, Malucca, Phillipina, and India, by Northerly Navigation, to the Renowne, Honour, and Benifit of her Maiesties State and Communally.
Page 680 - A Collection of Voyages and Travels compiled from the Curious and Valuable Library of the late Earl of Oxford. 2 vols.

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About the author (2010)

Donald F. Lach is the Bernadotte E. Schmitt Professor Emeritus in modern history at the University of Chicago.

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