Parents, Their Children, and Schools

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Westview Press, 1993 - Education - 192 pages
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Parental involvement with children at home, in school, and in the community is one of the most important factors in educational success. Yet we know very little about the most effective approaches to parental intervention. Moreover, not all parents have the same resources or opportunities to act on the educational expectations they have for their children. This book examines the resources available to parents and the actions parents can take to further their children's education. It is the first study of the subject based on major survey data, drawing from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 - a national survey of 26,000 eighth graders, their parents, teachers, and school administrators. The authors explore several important debates, including the extent to which parental involvement can mitigate the constraints of poverty for minorities and disadvantaged students, school choice and equality of educational opportunity, and the effects that school-sponsored activities involving parents have on educational performance. Certain to change the thinking of educators and policymakers, this book is essential reading for scholars and parents as well.

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Contents

An Introduction
1
Data Base and Sample Selection
7
Parent Involvement in the Home School and Community
13
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

James S. Coleman is an American sociologist who has focused much of his work on mathematical sociology. His areas of interest have been social conflict, collective decision making, and the sociology of education. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1955 and taught at Johns Hopkins University. Coleman is best known for heading a commission charged by the federal government with investigating the lack of educational opportunities for minorities in public schools. The document produced by the commission, Equity of Educational Opportunity (1966), is better known as the Coleman Report. It indicated that student achievement has more to do with family background and peer environment than with school resources. The Coleman Report became the basis for the institution of student busing to achieve racial integration in public schools.

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