THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND AND THEIR TIMES (Google eBook)

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Page 622 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide ; To lose good days that might be better spent ; To waste long nights in pensive discontent ; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow ; To feed on hope ; to pine with fear and sorrow ; To have thy Prince's grace, yet want her peer?
Page 724 - Church, to which the scaffolds contributed exceedingly. The conflagration was so universal, and the people so astonished, that from the beginning, I know not by what despondency or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it, so that there was nothing heard or seen but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods; such a strange consternation there was upon them...
Page 613 - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.
Page 954 - Newcastle. He fell into a fit of crying the moment he came into the chapel, and flung himself back in a stall, the archbishop hovering over him with a...
Page 954 - ... other. Then returned the fear of catching cold ; and the duke of Cumberland, who was sinking with heat, felt himself weighed down, and turning round, found it was the duke of Newcastle standing upon his train, to avoid the chill of the marble.
Page 952 - Here lies Fred, Who was alive, and is dead. Had it been his father, I had much rather. Had it been his brother, Still better than another. Had it been his sister, No one would have missed her. Had it been the whole generation, Still better for the nation. But since 'tis only Fred, Who was alive, and is dead, There's no more to be said.
Page 613 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear.
Page 954 - Attending the funeral of a father could not be pleasant; his leg extremely bad, yet forced to stand upon it near two hours ; his face bloated and distorted with his late paralytic stroke, which has affected too one of his eyes ; and placed over the mouth of the vault, into which, in all probability, he must himself so soon descend ; think how unpleasant a situation ! He bore it all with a firm and unaffected countenance.
Page 809 - WHEREAS the late King James the Second, by the Assistance of divers evil Counsellors, Judges, and Ministers employed by him, did endeavour to subvert and extirpate the Protestant Religion and the Laws and Liberties of this Kingdom.
Page 579 - The Daughter of Debate, that eke discord doth sow, Shall reap no gain where former rule hath taught still peace to grow No foreign banished wight shall anchor in this port; Our realm it brooks no stranger's force, let them elsewhere resort. Our rusty sword with rest shall first his edge employ, To poll their tops that seek such change and gape for joy.

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