Library Services to the Incarcerated: Applying the Public Library Model in Correctional Facility Libraries (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Libraries Unlimited, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 246 pages
3 Reviews
Learn how to provide exemplary library service to individuals in prison or jail, by applying the public library model when working with inmate populations. These authors, a jail librarian and an outreach librarian, offer a wealth of insights and ideas, answering questions about facilities and equipment, collection development, services and programming; computers and the Internet; managing human resources, including volunteers and inmate workers; budgeting and funding; and advocacy within the facility and in the community. The approach is practical and down-to-earth, with numerous examples and anecdotes to illustrate concepts.
  

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User Review  - ecataldi - LibraryThing

For being kind of a heavy topic, this book managed to be super informative, intriguing, humorous at times (definitely helped with the tone of the book), and downright inspiring. I loved it! This is a ... Read full review

Review: Library Services to the Incarcerated: Applying the Public Library Model in Correctional Facility Libraries

User Review  - Bdalton - Goodreads

Approximately 2.38 million Americans are being held in either federal or state prisons. Nationally the prison inmate population grew by 2.6 percent between 1995 and 2005. In Colorado, during this same ... Read full review

Contents

For Patrons
120
Collection Development
123
Community Needs Assessments
124
Surveys
125
Community Forums or Focus Groups
127
Interviews
128
Collection Development Policy
130
Selection
131

Library as Window to the World
23
Understanding Yourself
27
Five Types of Corrections Librarians
28
The Realist
29
Do You Belong Behind Bars?
30
Know Thyself
32
Patience
33
Healthy Lack of Perfectionism
34
Good Boundaries
35
Touching
36
Flexibility and Adaptability
38
Agoraphobics Please Apply
39
Professional Qualities
41
Ability to Cope with Criticism Confrontation and Conflict
42
Good Boundaries
43
Diplomacy Tact and Salesmanship
44
Or the Ability to Work Alone for Long Periods of Time
45
Ability to Reinterpret Library Bill of Rights and Freedom to Read Statement for a Correctional Environment
46
Broad Knowledge of Library Functions
47
Service to the Traditionally Underserved
49
Something New Every Day
50
Personal Challenges and How to Surmount Them
52
Intimidation
54
Sexual Harassment
55
PhysicalRomantic Attraction
57
Conclusion
58
Understanding the Patrons
61
Female Inmates and Prisoners
63
Juvenile Offenders
66
Profiles of Inmate Behavior
69
The Bully
70
The Narcissist
72
The Charmer aka Romeo
74
The SuckUp also known as The BrownNoser
75
The Jailhouse Lawyer
77
The Pod Father or Mother
78
Staying Safe
80
Fan Clubs and Fan Mail
81
User Needs
82
Designated Budget
83
Response Time
85
New Books that Dont Smell Like Toothpaste
86
Understanding the System
89
Prison
92
Community Corrections
94
Juvenile Facilities
95
Regulations and Standards
96
Working with Other Staff
98
Ethics and Accountability
101
Challenges and How to Handle Them
105
Challenges to Your Services
106
Fiscal Challenges
107
Challenges to Your Materials
109
Conclusion
110
Facilities and Equipment
113
Physical Space
114
Shelving
115
Staff Workspace
116
Computer Technology and Equipment
117
Computer Technology
119
Leisure Reading
132
Literacy
133
Legal Resources
135
Other Fancy Stuff
137
Movies and Music
138
Curriculum Support
140
Hardcover versus Paperback
142
Deposit Collections
143
Donations
146
Cataloging and Classification
147
Cataloging Nonfiction
148
Classifying Fiction
149
Ongoing Evaluation
151
Circulation and Cataloging
153
Circulation Policy
154
Circulation Procedures
156
Checking Out
157
Patron Registration
158
Preserving The Collection
159
Staffing
161
Staffing Needs Assessment
162
The Job Description
163
Auditions and Interviews
165
The Background Check
168
Ongoing Professional Development
169
Motivation
171
Volunteers
173
Inmate Workers Trusties
174
Services and Programs
181
Logistical Considerations
182
User Needs
183
The Cardinal Rules of Program Planning
184
Recreational Programs
187
A Cup of Sugar from My Dear Granny
190
Programs that Might Not Go Over
191
Law Library
192
Training for Legal Research
194
Erica and Sheilas Top Ten List of Questions Asked by Jail Inmates
195
Budget
199
Presenting and Defending Your Budget
200
Courting Strategic Allies
201
What to Do When the Money Is Not Forthcoming
202
Community Collaboration
205
Advocacy and Activism
209
Public Relations
210
Professional Organizations
211
State Library Associations
212
ACLU
213
Conclusion
215
Glossary of Terms
217
MustHave Core Collection Suggestions
221
Job Descriptions
225
Generic Library ClerkLibrary Assistant Position
227
Generic Inmate Clerk Position
229
Sample Interview Questions
231
Performance Measures
233
Suggested Readings
237
Index
241
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 18 - Association are defined in terms of the contribution that librarianship can make in ameliorating or solving the critical problems of society; support for efforts to help inform and educate the people of the United States on these problems and to encourage them to examine the many views on and the facts regarding each problem; and the willingness of ALA to take a position on current critical issues with the relationship to libraries and library service set forth in the position statement.
Page 18 - ... efforts to help inform and educate the people of the United States on these problems and to encourage them to examine the many views on and the facts regarding each problem; and (c) the willingness of ALA to take a position on current critical issues with the relationship to libraries and library service set forth in the position statement.
Page 13 - Libraries are portals to new worlds. They serve up possibility, learning, and, in a word, freedom. In this sense libraries run counter to the spirit and intent of the average prison, where jailers scrutinize every portal, every possibility, and every freedom, including the figurative ones offered in the quiet refuge of the library.
Page 20 - The library is the one place where young inmates should not be reminded of their confinement. After all, the library is the heart of any academic environment; and isn't home where the heart is?

About the author (2006)

SHEILA CLARK is Library Supervisor, Arapahoe Library District, Detention Facility Library in Centennial, Colorado

Erica MacCreaigh is Outreach Services Librarian, Arapahoe Library District, Centennial, Colorado.

Bibliographic information