Does Money Matter?: The Effect of School Resources on Student Achievement and Adult Success (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Brookings Institution Press - Business & Economics - 296 pages
1 Review
Many believe that American education can only be improved with a sizable infusion of new resources into the nation's schools. Others find little evidence that large increases in spending lead to improvements in educational performance. Do additional school resources actually make any difference? The evidence on this question offers a striking paradox. Many analysts have found that extra school resources play a negligible role in improving student achievement while children are in school. Yet many economists have gathered data showing that students who attend well-endowed schools grow up to enjoy better job market success than children whose education takes place in schools where resources are limited. For example, children who attend schools with a lower pupil-teacher ratio and a better educated teaching staff appear to earn higher wages as adults than children who attend poorer schools. This book, which grew out of a Brookings conference, brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to discuss the evidence on the link between school resources and educational and economic outcomes. In a lively exchange of views, they debate whether additional spending can improve the performance of the nation's schools. In addition to editor Gary Burtless, the contributors include Eric Hanushek, University of Rochester; James Heckman, University of Chicago; Julian Betts, University of California, San Diego; Richard Murnane, Harvard University; Larry Hedges, University of Chicago; and Christopher Jencks, Northwestern University. Dialogues on Public Policy
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction and Summary
1
School Differences and Student Achievement
4
Educational Resources and Earnings
12
Reconciling the Results
16
The Evidence in This Book
20
School Resources and Student Performance
21
The Relation between School Resources and Student Performance
24
Evidence from Fifteen Schools in Austin
26
Summary of the Literature
104
Lessons from the Experiences of SouthernBorn Blacks
128
Conclusions
133
References
136
Is There a Link between School Inputs and Earnings? Fresh Scrutiny of an Old Literature
141
The Direct Impact of School Inputs on Earnings
143
Five Hypotheses to Explain the Observed Patterns
163
The Impact of School Inputs on Educational Attainment
178

Labor Market Effects of School Quality
27
Is There a Link between School Inputs and Earnings?
32
Does Measured School Quality Really Matter?
36
Conclusion
40
References
41
School Resources and Student Performance
43
The Aggregate Story
44
Approaches to Analyzing the Use of School Resources
52
Educational Production Function Estimates
54
Wage Determination Models with School Resources
62
Conclusions
68
References
70
Have Times Changed? The Relation between School Resources and Student Performance Aggregate Data
74
Educational Production Function Estimates
80
Improving Research on Resource Utilization
88
References
90
Evidence from Fifteen Schools in Austin Texas
93
Labor Market Effects of School Quality Theory and Evidence
97
A Theoretical Model of School Quality Education and Earnings
100
Suggestions for Future Research
182
Conclusion
183
A Response to Card and Krueger
185
References
188
Does Measured School Quality Really Matter? An Examination of the EarningsQuality Relationship
192
The Empirical Plan and the Framework for Organizing the Evidence
198
A Comparison of the Aggregate and IndividualLevel Data Approaches
207
The Source of Identifying Information in AggregateData Models
209
Testing Monotonicity of the QualityEarnings Relationship
213
An Empirical Exploration of Two Representative Models
220
Conclusion
252
Description of the Analysis Samples
254
Schooling Quality Data Sources
257
Additional Tables
260
Rejoinder to David Card and Alan Krueger
285
References
292
Index
294
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page v - The President bears final responsibility for the decision to publish a manuscript as a Brookings book. In reaching his judgment on the competence, accuracy, and objectivity of each study, the President is advised by the director of the appropriate research program and weighs the views of a panel of expert outside readers who report to him in confidence on the quality of the work. Publication of a work signifies that it is deemed a competent treatment worthy of public consideration but does not imply...
Page v - It is the function of the Trustees to make possible the conduct of scientific research, and publication, under the most favorable conditions, and to safeguard the independence of the research staff in the pursuit of their studies and in the publication of the results of such studies. It is not a part of their function to determine, control, or influence the conduct of particular investigations or the conclusions reached.
Page viii - The views expressed here are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the trustees, officers, or staff members of the Brookings Institution.
Page v - Vartan Gregorian Bernadine P. Healy Samuel Hellman Warren Hellman Robert A. Helman Thomas W. Jones Breene M. Kerr Thomas G. Labrecque Donald F. McHenry Jessica Tuchman Mathews David O. Maxwell Walter Y.

References to this book

Social Capital
David Halpern
Limited preview - 2005
All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information