A history of England: from the first invasion by the Romans, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
E. Cummiskey, 1827 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 175 - ... supreme head of the church of England, without the addition of the qualifying clause, which had been in the first instance admitted. The summer was spent in administering the oath, in receiving the signatures...
Page 123 - I desire that much, and if it be God's pleasure, I pray him to send this matter shortly to a good end, and then I trust, my Lord, to recompense part of your great pains.
Page iii - I shall rehearse you the dolorous end of those babes ; not after every way that I have heard, but after that way that I have so heard, by such men and by such means, as methinketh it were hard but it should be true.
Page 225 - It was a wonder to see how princely, with how excellent gravity, and inestimable majesty, his highness exercised there the very office of supreme head of the church of England. How benignly his grace essayed to convert the miserable man; how strong and manifest reasons his highness alleged against him. I wish the princes and potentates of Christendom to have had a meet place to have seen it.
Page 134 - as thy father slew mine, " so will I slay thee, and all of thy kin," and plunging his dagger into the breast of the young prince, bade the tutor go, and bear the news to the boy's mother. The queen on her arrival was presented with the head of her enemy, the duke, and ordered it to be encircled with a diadem of paper, and placed on the walls of York t.
Page 222 - God," was studiously omitted; and it was merely enacted, that " the " inheritance of the crown should be, rest, remain, and " abide in the most royal person of the then sovereign " lord, king Henry VII., and the heirs of his body law...
Page 139 - Had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, He would not have given me over in my grey hairs.
Page 160 - ... contrary to the law of God, or prejudicial to the rights of the king, or prohibitory of such reforms as he might judge useful to the church of England*.
Page 191 - And now you shall begin, and by likelihood I shall follow, I set not a rush by it, for when they have done the uttermost they can, then I am sure of...
Page 152 - London, six oxen were daily eaten at a breakfast ; and every tavern was full of his meat; and who had any acquaintance in his family, should have as much boiled and roast as he could carry on a long dagger.

Bibliographic information