The End of Ideology: On the Exhaustion of Political Ideas in the Fifties : with "The Resumption of History in the New Century"

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Daniel Bell
Harvard University Press, 1962 - Social Science - 501 pages
2 Reviews

Named by the Times Literary Supplement as one of the 100 most influential books since the end of World War II, The End of Ideology has been a landmark in American social thought, regarded as a classic since its first publication in 1962.

Daniel Bell postulated that the older humanistic ideologies derived from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were exhausted, and that new parochial ideologies would arise. In a new introduction to the year 2000 edition, he argues that with the end of communism, we are seeing a resumption of history, a lifting of the heavy ideological blanket and the return of traditional ethnic and religious conflicts in the many regions of the former socialist states and elsewhere.

  

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Review: The End of Ideology

User Review  - Jemera Rone - Goodreads

too tedious to finish Read full review

Review: The End of Ideology

User Review  - Steven Peterson - Goodreads

In its time, a classic. Time can undermine analyses of the social and political realm as forces move society in different directions. Bell argued that old time ideological frameworks had lost their ... Read full review

Contents

Contents
xi
A Critique
21
Is There a Ruling Class in America?
47
The Themes of Alienation
355
Copyright

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About the author (1962)

Daniel Bell, an American sociologist and journalist, studied at City College of New York and Columbia University. As a journalist he was an editor of Fortune magazine and later served on several presidential committees. His work as chairman of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences' Commission on the Year 2000 led to the publication of a collection of futuristic essays and discussions by some of the finest minds of the century. His teaching career included posts at Chicago, Columbia, and Harvard universities. In Bell's best-known book, The Coming of Post-Industrial Society (1976), he analyzed the emerging role of information technology in the West. He was among the first scholars to realize that the production of information and knowledge would eclipse manufacturing in the developed world. Bell will be most remembered for his groundbreaking work in social change. He contended that new theories and models of decision making had to be devised to address the issues presented by an information-based society.

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