Speech and Phenomena, and Other Essays on Husserl's Theory of Signs

Front Cover
Northwestern University Press, 1973 - Philosophy - 166 pages
13 Reviews
In Speech and Phenomena, Jacques Derrida situates the philosophy of language in relation to logic and rhetoric, which have often been seen as irreconcilable criteria for the use and interpretations of signs. His critique of Husserl attacks the position that language is founded on logic rather than on rhetoric; instead, he claims, meaningful language is limited to expression because expression alone conveys sense. Derrida's larger project is to confront phenomenology with the tradition it has so often renounced--the tradition of Western metaphysics.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
0
4 stars
0
3 stars
5
2 stars
2
1 star
6

Review: Speech and Phenomena and Other Essays on Husserl's Theory of Signs

User Review  - Goodreads

so, this undoes Husserl's phenomenology. that's kinda cool, except that phenomenology was already a waste of space, so . Read full review

Review: Speech and Phenomena and Other Essays on Husserl's Theory of Signs

User Review  - sologdin - Goodreads

so, this undoes Husserl's phenomenology. that's kinda cool, except that phenomenology was already a waste of space, so . Read full review

Contents

Introduction to the Problem of Signs
1
Sign and Signs
17
The Reduction of Indication
27
Meaning and Representation
48
Signs and the Blink of an Eye
60
The Voice That Keeps Silence
70
The Supplement of Origin
88
A Note on the Phenomenology
107
Differance
129
Index of Passages Cited from Husserl
161
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1973)

Jacques Derrida was born in El-Biar, Algeria on July 15, 1930. He graduated from the École Normal Supérieure in 1956. He taught philosophy and logic at both the University of Paris and the École Normal Supérieure for around 30 years. His works of philosophy and linguistics form the basis of the school of criticism known as deconstruction. This theory states that language is an inadequate method to give an unambiguous definition of a work, as the meaning of text can differ depending on reader, time, and context. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 40 books on various aspects of deconstruction including Of Grammatology, Glas, The Postcard: From Socrates to Freud and Beyond, and Ulysses Gramophone: Hear Say Yes in Joyce. He died of pancreatic cancer on October 9, 2004 at the age of 74.

David B. Allison is professor of philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is the editor of the groundbreaking anthology "The New Nietzsche.

Bibliographic information