The Divine Fire (Google eBook)

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Archibald Constable, 1904 - 597 pages
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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.
  

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Page 140 - twould win me That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome ! those caves of ice ! And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware ! Beware ! His flashing eyes, his floating hair ! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise.
Page 604 - Europe. The story of the Italian revolutionary movement ... is full of such incidents as the novelist most desires . . . this novel is one of the strongest of the year, vivid in conception, and dramatic in execution, filled with intense human feeling, and worked up to a tremendously impressive climax.
Page 601 - Professor Dicey recently said, ' If you like a detective story take care you read a good detective story.' This is a good detective story, and it is the better because the part of the hero is not filled by a member of the profession. . . . The reader will not want to put the book down until he has reached the last pace. Most ingeniously constructed and well written into the bargain.
Page 601 - ... *If you like a detective story take care you read a good detective story ' This is a good detective story, and it is the better because the part of the hero is not filled by a member of the profession. . . . The reader will not want to put the book down until he has reached the last pace. Moat ingeniously constructed and well written into the bargain.
Page 601 - THE HOLLADAY CASE was a capital story of crime and mystery- In THE MARATHON MYSTERY the author is in even firmer command of the trick. He is skillful in keeping his reader in suspense, and every element in it is cunningly adjusted to preserving the mystery inviolate until the end." Boston Transcript: "The excellence of its style, Mr. Stevenson apparently knowing well the dramatic effect of fluency and brevity, and the rationality of avoiding false clues and attempts unduly to mystify his readers.
Page 601 - The excellence of its style, Mr. Stevenson apparently knowing well the dramatic effect of fluency and brevity, and the rationality of avoiding false clues and attempts unduly to mystify his readers." Boston Herald: " This is something more than an ordinary detective story. It thrills you and holds your attention to the end. But besides all this the characters are really well drawn and your interest in the plot is enhanced by interest in the people who play their parts therein.
Page 599 - The Diary of a Musician Edited by DOLORES M. BACON With decorations and illustrations by CHARLES EDWARD HOOPER and H. LATIMER BROWN $1.50...
Page 602 - The Princess Passes By the Authors of *' The Lightning Conductor" With numerous full-page pictures by EDWARD PENFIELD, and several reproductions of photographs of the scenes. $1.50 A humorous romance of travel in northern Prance and Switzerland, by the Italian Lakes, among the Valois Alps and to Nice and Monte Carlo.
Page 602 - The action is brisk, and the descriptions of scenery are delightful. In the working out there is originality enough to savor half a dozen modern novels. Just asimple love story, but concerning a pair of lovers whose outlook on life and love is so broad that to share it for an hour or two is to be glad that one lives and proud if the capacity for loving has not been frittered away.
Page 599 - The naivete of the book is inimitable. . . . That marvelous, appalling, mad thing named genius, at once the despair of those who do and those who do not possess it, is here pictured with extraordinary fascination and power." Chicago Tribune. "Uncommon power distinguishes it; ... a curiously interesting book." Chicago Record-Herald. "A work of usual character; . . . entirely original in its scope." San Francisco Chronicle. "Take it how you will, 'The Diary of a Musician

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