Other Peoples' Myths: The Cave of Echoes

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University of Chicago Press, Nov 1, 1995 - Religion - 225 pages
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Other People's Myths celebrates the universal art of storytelling, and the rich diversity of stories that people live by. Drawing on Biblical parables, Greek myths, Hindu epics, and the modern mythologies of Woody Allen and soap operas, Wendy Doniger O'Flaherty encourages us to feel anew the force of myth and tradition in our lives, and in the lives of other cultures. She shows how the stories of mythology—whether of Greek gods, Chinese sages, or Polish rabbis—enable all cultures to define themselves. She raises critical questions about the way we interpret mythical stories, especially the way different cultures make use of central texts and traditions. And she offers a sophisticated way of looking at the roles myths play in all cultures.
  

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Review: Other Peoples' Myths: The Cave of Echoes

User Review  - Marge - Goodreads

Although I didn't understand all of O'Flaherty's argument (mainly because I have no background in Hinduism), I did enjoy the book, especially the sections on ways in which the rituals and myths of others illuminate one's own. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Strangers Animals Gods and Children as Others
2
The Argument
4
Other Scholars Myths The Hunter and the Sage
7
Scholars and People
10
The Sages Myth
12
Fire and Ice
15
Academic Hardware and Religious Software
21
Other Peoples Rituals Daksha Pentheus and Jesus
97
Daksha and Shiva
98
Pentheus and Dionysus
103
Myth with Ritual
111
Other Peoples Myths The Place in the Woods
119
The Theater of Myth
121
Ritual without Myth
125
Myth without Ritual
127

Other Peoples Lies The Cave of Echoes
25
The Cave of Archetypes
33
Myths and Classics
37
Other Peoples Classics Retelling the Mahabharata
45
The Otherness of the Classics
50
Myth as Childs Play
54
Fluid and Fixed Texts in the East
56
Impermanence and Eternity in India
64
Other People as Animals Rudra Lord of Sacrificial Beasts
75
If I Were a Horse
76
Humans as Sacrificial Animals
82
Carnivorous Hunters and Vegetarian Sages
89
Animals as NonOthers
93
The Shock of Recognition
129
Myths about Rituals
132
Other Peoples Lives The Rabbi from Cracow
135
The Rabbi from Cracow
137
Shooting at Pluralistic Ducks
141
The Audience inside the Story
147
The Recognition of Myth in Life
153
The Roundhouse of Myths
159
Notes
167
Bibliography
197
Index
207
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Wendy Doniger O'Flaherty is the Mircea Eliade Professor of the History of Religions in the Divinity School and a professor in the Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations and the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. She is the author of numerous books, including, most recently, The Woman Who Pretended to Be Who She Was.

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