Thomas Edison: Inventor of the Age of Electricity

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Twenty-First Century Books, 2003 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 128 pages
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Thomas Edison, one of the world's greatest inventors, complied an unprecedented, 1,093 patents during his eighty-four-year lifetime. Blessed with natural genius, Edison worked up to twenty hours a day, seven days a week. Through hard work and perseverance, he spurred the growth of three industries. He blazed the trail for commercial electric power, transformed the entertainment industry through the creation of motion pictures, and helped create a recorded music industry through his invention of the phonograph.
  

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Contents

The Seventh Child
7
The Candy Butcher
19
The Tramp Telegrapher
29
The Talking Machine
39
Lighting the World
51
Power on Pearl Street
61
Lights Camera Action
71
Batteries and Concrete Houses
83
A World at War
95
An Aging Genius
105
Important Dates in Thomas Edisons Life
114
Pronunciation Guide
118
Bibliography
119
Further Reading
121
Index
124
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Tagliaferro is a journalist and author and contributes regularly to The New York Times.

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