Life with the Trotters (Google eBook)

Front Cover
H.T. White, editor and publisher, 1889 - Dexter (Race horse). - 450 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 143 - ... which he would get on the horse's back. On these occasions the horse was shown to halter, and Jimmy, who learned to distinguish such events from those in which the sulky was used, would follow Dave and Rarus out on the quarter stretch ; and then when the halt was made in front of the grand stand, Dave would stoop down, and in a flash Jimmy would jump on his back, run up his shoulder, from there leap on the horse's back, and there he would stand, his head high in the air and his tail out stiff...
Page 414 - She would stand quietly enough," says her driver, " while being hitched to the sulky," although she had previously been kicking and plunging in her stall, " but she would shake and tremble until I have heard her feet make the same noise against the hard ground that a person's teeth will when the body is suddenly chilled ; that is, her feet actually chattered on the ground.
Page 388 - ... from overdriving, but from allowing them to get cold, from watering them when they are hot, from feeding them when they are tired, and from general neglect. A tired roadster seldom gets a bed as deep and soft as he ought to have. The famous Mr. Splau remarks upon this point as follows : " What horses want is plenty of fresh air, to be comfortably clothed, and to have a good bed at all times. No matter how well you feed or care for a man, if you put him in a bad bed at night he will be very apt...
Page 416 - ... together as well as you could wish. When it was bed-time, Charlie would lie down on his cot in one corner of the stall, his pillow being a bag containing the mare's morning feed of oats ; the Maid would ensconce herself in another corner ; and somewhere else in the stall the dog would stretch himself out. About five o'clock in the morning the Maid would get a little restless and hungry. She knew well enough where the oats were, 1 Johnston was an extremely nervons horse, and the dog; was procured...
Page 416 - They were a great family," says Mr. Doble, "that old mare, Old Charlie, and the dog, apparently interested in nothing else in the world but themselves, and getting along together as well as you could wish. When it was bed-time Charlie would lie down on. his cot in one corner of the stall, his pillow being a bag containing the mare's morning feed of oats ; the Maid would ensconce herself in another corner ; and somewhere else in the stall the dog would stretch himself out. About five o'clock in...
Page 55 - From the day of its birth," says the historian, " it was treated differently from any other animal on the place. As soon as it had been weaned, a suitable stall was built in a big barn for its accommodation, and from that day forth nothing was left undone to secure its comfort; and it was not long before Conklin and his colt were the talk of that end of Long Island. When the colt was three years old it was broken to harness, and during the following summer took part in a little race on the Island,...
Page 152 - I asked him what he was doing and he replied that he had returned to Leningrad to recover his innocence.
Page 434 - I can not tell you any more than I can how big a lump of chalk is. Colts differ in size, stamina, disposition, and strength. Some have got to indulge in a little foolishness before they are ready to do right play with the birds along the fence, or the shadows of the poles, while others are strict business all the time. It is safe enough to figure not to exceed four miles with any colt and not less than two and one-half. With the proper care, such as walking and turning out, colts do not need...
Page 299 - My experience has been that no horse can be successfully driven with anything like a severe bit. I never saw one that was even broken of the habit of pulling in that way. If you put a severe bit in the horse's mouth and pull on it it makes the horse mad and irritates him ; the further you drive him and the harder you pull him, the more he will pull against it. When I was a boy, almost every trotter I saw would pull in a disagreeable manner when being driven at top speed. At the...
Page 415 - ... stand, she would refuse to put forth her best speed, despite the efforts of her driver. The result in such cases was, of course, as she foresaw, that the judges, perceiving that the start would be an unfair one, rang the recall bell. "On the contrary," says Mr. Doble, "if she had a good chance to beat the other horses in scoring, she would go along gradually with them until pretty close to the wire, and then of her own accord come with a terrible rush of speed, so that when the word was given...

Bibliographic information