Families on the Fault Line: America's Working Class Speaks About the Family, the Economy, Race, and Ethnicity

Front Cover
HarperCollins Canada, Limited, 1994 - Social Science - 284 pages
0 Reviews
With the sensitivity and compassion for which her work is renowned, she shows us how much all working-class families - white, black, Latino, or Asian - have in common and how valiantly they cope with the many challenges in their lives. And in a brilliant sociological and psychological analysis, she also explores how the failing economy has helped to create seemingly unbridgeable divisions among them. In this context, she explains how the social and economic realities of working-class family life form the backdrop against which racial and ethnic tensions have escalated to their present precarious place on the fault line.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Families on the fault line: America's working class speaks about the family, the economy, race, and ethnicity

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Sixteen years after the publication of Worlds of Pain ( LJ 1/1/77), which considered 50 Bay Area working-class couples, Rubin returns to reevaluate the impact of social, political, and economic ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
PART n THE FAMILY AND THE ECONOMY
69
Shattered Dreams
126
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Lillian B. Rubin is an internationally recognized author and social scientist She is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Queens College, C.U.N.Y., in New York and Senior Research Associate at the Institute for the Study of Social Change at the University of California, Berkeley Currently, Dr. Rubin resides on both coasts, spending part of each year in New York City and part in the San Francisco Bay area.

Bibliographic information