A Treatise of practical instructions in the medical and surgical uses of electricity including instructions in electrical diagnosing and a new method of general and local electrization (Google eBook)

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Kalamazoo Publishing Company, 1882 - Electrotherapeutics - 249 pages
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Page 12 - That changed through all, and yet in all the same, Great in the earth as in the ethereal frame, Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees : Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent...
Page 52 - Dissections daily convince us of our ignorance of disease, and cause us to blush at our prescriptions. What mischief have we done under the belief of false facts and false theories! We have assisted in multiplying diseases ; we have done more, we have increased their mortality.
Page 36 - In the course of the investigation he discovered the fact that muscular contractions are excited in the leg of a frog recently killed, when two metals, such as zinc and silver, one of which touches the crural nerve, and the other the muscles to which it is distributed, are brought into contact with one another.
Page 216 - ... effect, crackling noise, and luminous character, similar to that which we are all accustomed to observe when touching a charged Leyden jar. I may remark the coincidence that, simultaneously with the heat of the body passing off, the electricity was evolved ; and I am therefore led to ask the question, Are not heat, electric and galvanic fluids, one and the same thing ? Does not the fact of the passing off of both imponderable substances at one and the same time strengthen this conclusion ? "...
Page 53 - The success of direct medication comes from the definiteness of diagnosis determining the exact condition of a function or part. To illustrate, it is not sufficient in selecting a sedative to know that the pulse is frequent, using alike Veratrum, Aconite, Digitalis, Gelseminum, or Lobelia. Frequency is but one element of the lesion : and we have to determine in addition the strength or weakness of the circulation, the degree of obstruction of the capillary circulation, and the condition of the...
Page 135 - The vagina was studded with them from the size of a pin point to the size of a bean, the largest one being in the urethra.
Page 103 - ... and we well know that iron becomes a magnet only by induction, and loses its magnetic power the moment the electric current passes from it. Hence the blood, through the agency of the iron it contains, can easily assume a positive state at the instant it receives the electric charge from the air at the lungs. It can then pass into the arteries, and by friction throw off its electricity into the nerves, and again assume a negative state as it enters the veins. I now consider the ELECTRIC or MAGNETIC...
Page 54 - ... gelseminum; atony of the nervous system and tendency to stasis of blood, aconite and belladonna; feeble impulse from the heart, without capillary obstruction, digitalis, etc. It is not sufficient to know that the tongue is coated, indicating an impairment or arrest of digestion. We make this secretion give us the history of blood lesions, as well as of gastric and intestinal derangements.
Page 92 - Support is a cup and stem made of highly polished hard rubber very light and durable, shaped to fit the neck of the womb, with openings for the secretions to pass out; as shown by the cuts. Cups are made with extended lips to correct flexions and versions of the womb. The...
Page 103 - I mean that nerves of involuntary motion are laid along the arteries to receive the charge of electricity from the positive blood that flows in them. These views of the circulation of the blood are strengthened by the fact, that the blood contains a certain portion of iron ; and we well know that iron becomes a magnet only by induction, and loses its magnetic power the moment the electric current passes from it. Hence the blood, through the agency of the iron it contains, can easily assume a positive...

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