Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther

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Hendrickson Publishers, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 441 pages
36 Reviews

"I cannot.. I will not... recant! Here I stand." This authoritative and inspiring story paints a vivid portrait of the crusader who spearheaded the Reformation. Considered one of the most readable biographies of Martin Luther, this volume is an illustrated look at the German religious reformer and his influence on Western civilization.

Martin Luther entered a monastery as a youth and as a man shattered the structure of the medieval church. Luther spoke out against the corrupt religious practices that then existed. His demand that the authority for doctrine and practice be Scriptures, rather than Popes or Councils, echoed around the world and ignited the Great Reformation. Accused of heresy and threatened with excommunication and death, Luther maintained his bold stand and refused to recant. In his crusade to eliminate religious abuses, he did more than any other man to establish the Protestant faith. With sound historical scholarship and penetrating insight, Roland Bainton examines Luther's widespread influence. He re-creates the spiritual setting of the sixteenth century, showing Luther's place within it and influence upon it. Richly illustrated with more than 100 woodcuts and engravings from Luther's own time, Here I Standdramatically brings to life Martin Luther, the great reformer.

Bainton published Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Lutherin 1950. As of 2008, it is still in print. Kenneth Scott Latourette, in the chapter notes for "Luther and the Rise and Spread of Lutheranism" in his History of Christianity, lauds Bainton's biography of Luther as "A superb combination of accurate scholarship based upon a thorough knowledge of the sources and secondary works with insight, vivid, readable literary style, and reproductions of contemporary illustrations. It also contains so valuable a bibliography as to render needless an extended one in this chapter." In his chapter on Luther's writings in Invitation to the Classics, Mark A. Noll singles out Bainton's biography:

"Of the many superlative treatments, a half-century old study by Roland Bainton, Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther, has justly won a reputation as a classic work on a classic subject."

  

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Review: Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther

User Review  - Bob - Goodreads

This was a terrific book. I think it does a great job meeting all the requirements of a good biography: creating a good context by which we can understand the times when the biographee lived (and how ... Read full review

Review: Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther

User Review  - Cheryl Gatling - Goodreads

I read this book as a young person, and as a young person, the story of Martin Luther's cloister conversion to the belief that the just are saved by faith, was thrilling. The belief that there is ... Read full review

Contents

The Vow
1
At Home and School
3
Religious Disquiet
6
The Haven of the Cowl
11
The Cloister
17
The Terror of the Holy
19
The Way of SelfHelp
25
The Merits of the Saints
27
The Menace to Morals
224
The Ground of Goodness
227
Rebuilding the Walls
232
The Callings
233
Economics
236
Politics
238
Church and State
242
The Middle Way
248

The Trip to Rome
29
The Gospel
33
The Failure of Confession
35
The Mystic Ladder
38
The Evangelical Experience
42
The Onslaught
50
The Indulgence for St Peters
56
The NinetyFive Theses
62
The Son of Iniquity
67
The Dominican Assault
70
The Case Transferred to Germany
74
The Interviews with Cajetan
78
Threatening Exile
82
The Saxon Hus
87
The Gauntlet of Eck
92
The Leipzig Debate
97
The Endorsement of Hus
101
The German Hercules
107
Erasmus
111
Melanchthon and Durer
115
Hutten and Sickingen
118
The Wild Boar in the Vineyard
125
The Sacraments and the Theory of the Church
130
Prosecution Resumed
132
The Bull Exsurge
135
The Bull Seeks Luther
139
The Appeal to Caesar
142
Publication of the Bull
148
Against the Execrable Bull of Antichrist
153
The Freedom of the Christian Man
155
Here I Stand
160
A Hearing Promised and Recalled
164
The Emperor Assumes Responsibility
168
Invitation to Luther Renewed
172
Luther Before the Diet
175
The Edict of Worms
181
My Patmos
186
At the Wartburg
188
Monasticism
193
The Mass
198
The Outbreak of Violence
199
The Return of the Exile
202
Turmoil
203
The Invitation to Come Back
208
The Return to Wittenberg
210
No Other Foundation
213
Nature History and Philosophy
214
Christ the Sole Revealer
218
The Word and the Sacraments
223
Hostility of the Reformed Papacy
249
Erasmus
254
Carlstadt
258
Müntzer
263
Banishment of the Agitators
265
Behemoth Leviathan and the Great Waters
268
Zwingli and the Anabaptists
269
Religion and Social Unrest
271
Luther and the Peasants
274
Müntzer Foments Rebellion
281
The Debacle and the Effect on the Reformation
285
The School for Character
291
Katherine von Bora
292
Domesticity
296
Children and Table Talk
298
Views of Marriage
305
Consolations of Home
309
The Church Territorial
312
Dissemination of the Reform
313
Practical Church Problems
317
The Godly Prince
320
The Protest
322
the Marburg Colloquy
326
The Augsburg Confession
331
The Church Tutorial
335
Doctrinal Problems in Translation
340
Catechisms
346
Liturgy
349
Music
351
Hymnbook
356
The Church Ministerial
359
Sermon on the Nativity
364
Exposition of Jonah
367
Prayer
370
The Struggle for Faith
372
His Depressions
375
The Way of Indirection
376
Wrestling with the Angel
378
The Rock of Scripture
381
The Measure of the Man
387
Attitude to the Anabaptists
389
Attitude to the Jews
393
The Papists and the Emperor
395
The Measure of the Man
398
Bibliography
403
References
413
Sources of Illustrations
425
Index
429
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About the author (2009)

A specialist in Reformation history, Roland H. Bainton was for forty-two years Titus Street Professor of ecclesiastical history at Yale, and he continued his writing well into his twenty years of retirement. Bainton wore his scholarship lightly and had a lively, readable style. His most popular book was "Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther" (1950)--which sold more than a million copies.

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