Lying and Deception in Everyday Life

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Michael Lewis, Carolyn Saarni
Guilford Press, 1993 - Psychology - 221 pages
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Taking into account the sheer ubiquity and ordinariness of deception, this interdisciplinary work moves away from the cut-and-dried notion of duplicity as evil and illuminates the ways in which deception can also be understood as a adaptive response to the demands of living with others. The book articulates the boundaries between unethical and adaptive deception demonstrating how some lies serve socially approved goals, while others provoke distrust and condemnation. Throughout, the volume focuses on the range of emotions--from feelings of shame, fear, or envy, to those of concern and compassion--that motivate our desire to deceive ourselves and others.
  

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Contents

Deceit and Illusion in Human Affairs
1
Deception and
30
The Human Face of
59
The Development of Deception
90
The Socialization of Emotional Dissemblance
106
How Women and Men
126
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About the author (1993)

Michael Lewis, PhD, is University Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry and Director of the Institute for the Study of Child Development at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School--University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. The author of over 300 professional articles, Dr. Lewis has been cited in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsweek, and other publications.

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