Velocipedes, Bicycles, & Tricycles: How to Make & how to Use Them. With a Sketch of Their History, Invention, & Progress (Google eBook)

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G. Routledge & sons, 1869 - 127 pages
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Contents

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21
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IV
77
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79
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VII
107
VIII
117

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Page 129 - Bancroft's History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent to the Declaration of Independence, in 1776. 7 vols., fcap. 8vo, Roxburghe, 15s. The History of France, from the Invasion of the Franks under Clovis to the Present Time.
Page 129 - This is, on the whole, the best History of England for young people which we have yet met with. The plan of the volume is excellent, and the chronological index, tables, and maps of the appendix, will make a useful handy book even for older readers.
Page 34 - To preserve the balance a small board covered and stuffed is placed before, on which the arms are laid, and in front of which is a little guiding pole, which is held in the hand to direct the route. The swiftness with which a person well practised can travel is almost beyond belief, 8, 9, and even 10 miles may, it is asserted, be passed over within the hour on good level ground.
Page 126 - They do not give power, they only utilize it. There must be an expenditure of power to produce speed. One is inclined to agree with the temperate remarks of Mr. Lander, CE, of Liverpool, rather than with the extravagant enthusiasm of American or French riders. As a means of healthful exercise it is worthy of attention. Certainly not...
Page 64 - It has the driving-wheel in front, with the direct action of the reel pedals, but the wheel is placed much nearer to the rear wheels than any of the tricycles yet made. This gives the rider a more complete control over the motion and action of the machine, and enables it to turn corners with the safety and celerity of the two-wheeler. Its construction is thus described : " From the axle of the hind wheel rises a bow-shaped brace, to which is bolted one end of the reach, which consists of two parallel...
Page 33 - Gernsback to Baden, which generally requires two hours, in about an hour, and convinced a number of amateurs, assembled on the occasion, of the great swiftness of this very interesting species of carriage. The principle of the invention is taken from the art of skating, and consists in the simple idea of a seat upon wheels driven forward by tire feet acting upon the ground.
Page 129 - D'Aubigne's History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. Abridged and Translated by the Rev. J. GILL. In post 8vo, cloth, price 5s. " Mr. Gill's careful and judicious abridgment of D'Aubigne"s History of the Reformation cannot fail to be acceptable to the numerous class of readers who lack either time or opportunity to study the original work.
Page 129 - The History of British India, from the Earliest English Intercourse. By CHARLES MACFARLANE. With 8 Illustrations and a Map. In foolscap 8vo, cloth, «. D'Aubtgn&s History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. Abridged and Translated by the Rev. J. GILL. In post Svo, cloth, price 5^. Watts' Scripture History, with a Map.
Page 59 - would be useful. THE TRICYCLE. IN all probability the three-wheeled velocipede will have a more enduring and wider-spread popularity than the two-wheeled. Not that those in present use are safer or even easier to guide than the bicycle, but they permit the body to remain in a sitting posture when going down hill and when the machine is at rest. An artist can sketch from the seat. It can be taken to a shady nook while the luncheon or quiet pipe is enjoyed, and what is lost in speed is made up in...
Page 50 - ... that the rider could give motion to the machine through the cranked axle which actuated the front wheel, instead of pressing his feet against the ground as in the old arrangement. This is the exact arrangement of the modern bicycle driving-wheel. He also points out : — " In constructing a velocipede according to this invention, I prefer that the seat or saddle should be supported by a spring, and that a cross handle should be provided for actuating the vertical steering-fork of the front wheel,...

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