Seven Mozart Librettos: A Verse Translation

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2011 - Music - 1167 pages
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"McClatchy's heroic labor is a remarkable achievement. . . . Mozart and Da Ponte will be smiling down on this volume."—Richard Wilbur

A landmark event in the world of music, Mozart's seven major librettos have finally been translated in verse with a sparkling poetic quality that matches the magnificence of the originals. Beginning this epic endeavor with his translation of The Magic Flute, first introduced at the Metropolitan Opera, McClatchy has now completed his translations of Idomeneo, The Abduction from the Seraglio, The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, Così Fan Tutte, and La Clemenza di Tito. The result is a brilliantly translated and handsomely designed volume that brings the lively wordplay and drama of the originals to life in a verse that matches the exuberance and lyricism of the original Da Ponte, Schikaneder, Varesco, Mazzolà, and Stephanie librettos. With facing-page text and an illuminating introduction to each opera-including a dramatic recap, a history of the opera, and a list of characters-this book is a masterpiece, the likes of which has never been seen in English before.
  

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Seven Mozart Librettos: A Verse Translation

User Review  - Larry Lipkis - Book Verdict

Celebrated poet McClatchy has done an invaluable service for lovers of Mozart's operas. He has undertaken the gargantuan task of rendering into idiomatic, accurate, and lively poetic English the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Athenable - LibraryThing

I've won a copy through First Reads and I think this sounds like a wonderful book. Read full review

Contents

02_Mzt_02_Abduction_6pp
132
03_Mzt_03_Figaro_6pp
270
04_Mzt_DonGiovanni_6pp
494
05_Mzt_CosiFanTutte_6pp
678
06_Mzt_LaClemenzaDiTito_6pp
866
07_Mzt_MagicFlute_6pp
976
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About the author (2011)

J. D. McClatchy is the author of six collections of poems, three books of prose, and thirteen original libretti performed around the world. The editor of the Yale Review, he lives in Stonington, Connecticut.

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