The skeptical era in modern history, or, The infidelity of the eighteenth century: the product of spiritual despotism (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Scribner, 1856 - Religion - 264 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 30 - He spake; and, to confirm his words, out-flew Millions of flaming swords, drawn from the thighs Of mighty Cherubim ; the sudden blaze Far round illumined Hell. Highly they raged Against the Highest, and fierce with grasped arms Clashed on their sounding shields the din of war, Hurling defiance toward the vault of Heaven.
Page 31 - And the nations were angry, and thy wrath is come, and the time of the dead, that they should be judged, and that thou shouldest give reward unto thy servants, the prophets, and to the saints, and them that fear thy name, small and great, and shouldest destroy them which destroy the earth.
Page 220 - ... or that of those sovereigns amongst whose deeds are recorded the massacre of St. Bartholomew and the revocation of the edict of Nantes ? The...
Page 239 - Evangelist Was ware, when her, who sits upon the waves, With kings in filthy whoredom he beheld ; She who with seven heads tower'd at her birth, And from ten horns her proof of glory drew, Long as her spouse in virtue took delight.
Page 22 - For then he was inspired, and from him came, As from the Pythian's mystic cave of yore, Those oracles which set the world in flame, Nor ceased to burn till kingdoms were no more...
Page 16 - The floods have lifted up, O Lord, the floods have lifted up their voice; the floods lift up their waves. The LORD on high is mightier than the noise of many waters, yea, than the mighty waves of the sea.
Page 24 - Here the self-torturing sophist, wild Rousseau, The apostle of affliction, he who threw Enchantment over passion, and from woe Wrung overwhelming eloquence, first drew The breath which made him wretched ; yet he knew How to make madness beautiful, and cast O'er erring deeds and thoughts a heavenly hue Of words, like sunbeams, dazzling as they past The eyes, which o'er them shed tears feelingly and fast.
Page 263 - How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost thou not avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth...
Page 250 - ... which the press and those who wrote for it were alike reduced. From the abject titlepages and dedications of the authors themselves, through the crowd of certificates collected from their friends to establish the orthodoxy of works that were often as little connected with religion as fairy tales, down to the colophon, supplicating pardon for any unconscious neglect of the authority of the church or any too free use of classical mythology, we are continually oppressed with painful proofs, not...
Page 87 - And all things weigh'd in custom's falsest scale ; Opinion an omnipotence, whose veil Mantles the earth with darkness, until right And wrong are accidents, and men grow pale Lest their own judgments should become too bright. And their free thoughts be crimes, and earth have too much light.

Bibliographic information