Streetbikes (Google eBook)

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MotorBooks International
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In my quest to find information on the problems of cooling a V-twin engine mounted with its crankshaft transverse (at 90) to the frame, as it is in Harley-Davidson motorcycles, I found this book. On page 29, I thought I found just what I needed in this line: "Even on the ubiquitous longitudinal air-cooled V-twin, the rear cylinder tends to run hotter...". All I would need further is a statement on what Stermer means by "longitudinal" because, with vehicles in general, "longitudinal" usually means that the crankshaft of the engine is parallel to the centre line of the frame of the vehicle. The use of "longitudinal V-Twin" in the manner Stermer has used it in that line clearly means that the cylinders are in line with the frame and the crankshaft is transverse. It makes no sense otherwise; if the crankshaft of a V-twin is parallel to the centre line of the frame then there is technically no "rear cylinder" as such.
However, on page 155 of the book, I read this: "In a transverse arrangement, the crankshaft is arranged across, or at a 90-degree angle, to (sic) the direction of the frame. On a longitudinal engine, the cranckshaft runs parallel to the frame. The crankshaft of a V engine may run longitudinally (as with a Moto Guzzi), or transversely as with most cruisers." This is the conventional definition and is the opposite of what Stermer means by "longitudinal V-twin" as used on page 29.
So I went through to see how often Stermer's use of "longitudinal V-twin" contradicted his definition of "longitudinal". The results are as follows:
The term "longitudinal V-twin" is mentioned four times.
First mention, on page 25: "The greater the V-angle, the longer the wheelbase may have to be to accommodate it, which is why some manufacturers tilt their longitudinal V-twin engines forward for better cooling and a shorter wheelbase. Arranging the cylinders transversely, into the airstream, enhances cooling."
Second mention, on page 26: "A longitudinally mounted (crankshaft runs front to back) V-twin is a natural. It keeps the bike narrow, which aids in moving through the air and in cornering clearance, and the crankshaft and transmission gears rotate on the same plate as the wheels, so it's easy to hook up a drive chain or belt. However, there can be cooling problems with the rear cylinder."
Third mention, on page 28: "Turn that V-twin from lengthwise (longitudinal, like a Harley-Davidson or Ducati) to transverse (across the frame), and you have the Moto Guzzi line with its 90-degree air-cooled V-twins."
The fourth mention, on page 29, has already been commented on in the first paragraph of this review.
Every single use of the term "longitudinal" as applied to V-twins is used opposite to how the book defines the term "longitudinal", even the use on page 26 that includes the book's definition of the term in parentheses, which turns the entire paragraph into complete nonsense. The usage on page 28 completely redefines the term "longitudinal" in the opposite manner from the definition on pages 26 and 155.
How can Stermer be telling us everything we need to know about streetbikes when he can't keep his terminology straight?
 

Contents

CHOOSING YOUR STREET MOTORCYCLE
8
Types of Street Motorcycles
10
ENGINE FACTORS
18
Engine Displacement
19
Number of Cylinders
21
Engine Configuration
23
CHASSIS STUFF
32
Other Bits of Frame Info
33
Motorcycle Clothing
102
What Makes a Good Riding Jacket
104
Womens Apparel
107
The Lower Half
108
Full Riding Suits
109
Rain Suits
110
Electric Clothing
112
Boots
114

Brakes
39
Final Drive
40
BRANDS OF STREET MOTORCYCLES
44
Alternative VTwin Manufacturers
50
Custom Motorcycles
54
FEATURES AND OPTIONS
56
Braking Options
58
Cruise Control
60
Sound Systems
62
Other Niceties
64
MOTORCYCLE ACCESSORIES
66
Seats Pegs and Bars
70
Touring Accessories
75
Wind Protection
79
Fairings
81
Wheels
83
SIDECARS TRAILERS AND TRIKES
86
Trailers for Hauling Motorcycles
91
Trikes
93
APPAREL
94
Types of Helmets
96
Other Helmet Considerations
98
PERFORMANCE CONSIDERATIONS
116
Suspension Upgrades
118
Lowering a Motorcycle
122
Brakes
125
MAINTENANCE
126
Tires
130
Batteries
135
Picking Up a Fallen Bike
137
LETS RIDE
138
Mechanical
141
Passengers
142
Women Who Ride
143
Commuting
144
Motorcycle Events Rides and Rallies
147
Camping by Motorcycle
148
Organized Tours
149
Track Days
151
Racing
152
Motorcycle Terms
154
Index
158
Copyright

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