The Journal of the Postal Microscopical Society: A Miscellany of Natural and Microscopical Science (Google eBook)

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Collins, 1882 - Microscopy
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Page 82 - ... the number of segments in the body has been greatly multiplied by gemmation, a separation of those of the posterior portion begins to take place ; a constriction forms itself about the beginning of the posterior third of the body, in front of which the alimentary canal undergoes a dilatation, whilst on the segment behind it, a proboscis and eyes are developed, so as to form the head of the young animal which is to be budded off ; and in due time, by the narrowing of the constriction, a complete...
Page 38 - Bombylius—the two valves of the proboscis serve no other purpose than to protect and guide the sucking-tubes; but in the flies which devour pollen, besides this function, there is also that of grinding the pollen, for which they have special adaptations, for the margins of the two valves at the point of union are transversely dentate with fine and parallel bands of chitine. Probably, the greater or less distance of these bands in different species is related to the different size of the pollen...
Page 81 - On the authority of hundreds of observations laboriously repeated at every season of the year, the author of this Report can declare with deliberate firmness, that there is not one word of truth in the above statement.
Page 159 - Fm. 117. a pocket lens, and when it is found to contain anything, the lower ring of wire can be slipped off, and the neck of the bottle pushed up through the upper ring, inverting the net. The contents may thus be poured off into another bottle, and after rearranging the apparatus, fishing may go on again. The object of the piece of wire connecting the two ends of the net is to keep all stiff, so that the bottle can bo turned in any direction, and yet both the upper and lower mouths of the net will...
Page 159 - The other end of the brass wire, which was left projecting for about six inches, is now to be firmly lashed to a light cane or stick, and the apparatus is complete. In order to use the apparatus, move it gently backwards and forwards on the surface of the water, under the surface, or just above the bottom of the pond, and among the weeds; the muslin will allow the water to pass through it, whilst any living organisms will be retained by the bottle. This can from time to time be examined with a...
Page 183 - ... watched, their various actions carefully noted, their behaviour under different circumstances, and especially those movements which seem to us mere vagaries, undirected by any suggestible motive or cause, well examined. A rich fruit of result, often new and curious and unexpected, will, I am sure, reward any one who studies living animals in this way. The most interesting parts, by far, of published Natural History are those minute, but graphic particulars, which have been gathered up by an attentive...
Page 82 - ... of groups ; and that spontaneous fission which we have seen in cells and groups of cells we here find repeated. In the lower Annelida, for example, " after the number of segments in the body has been greatly multiplied by gemmation, a separation of those of the posterior portion begins to take place ; a constriction forms itself about the beginning of the posterior third of the body, in front of which the alimentary canal undergoes a dilatation, whilst on the segment behind it a proboscis and...
Page 149 - I most certainly met with a ready supply, but here they were confined almost entirely to lean animals, and wherever I found a pig fat or healthy, no game were to be seen. In walking, this species uses the claw and tibial tooth with great facility — which act as a finger and thumb — in taking hold of a single hair. The male is smaller than the female, with the abdomen shorter, sub-orbr cular, and the segments lobate.
Page 81 - Bonnet's well known experiments, says : " On the authority of hundreds of observations, laboriously repeated at every season, the author of this report can declare with deliberate firmness, that there is not one word of truth in the above statement.
Page 37 - As to flies, it has been until now generally admitted that they are exclusively destined to fluid nutriment. But in the summer of 1867, I was somewhat surprised while observing in my garden an Eristalis tenax upon a flower of Śnothera media, to discover that it was eating the pollen.

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