The History of England: From the Accession of King George the Third, to the Conclusion of Peace in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-three, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1802 - Great Britain
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Page 6 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms never, never, never!
Page 14 - Against your Protestant brethren ; to lay waste their country, to desolate their dwellings, and extirpate their race and name, with these horrible hell-hounds of savage war! hellhounds, I say, of savage war.
Page 540 - I make it my humble and earnest prayer to Almighty God that Great Britain may not feel the evils which might result from so great a dismemberment of the empire; and that America may be free from those calamities which have formerly proved in the mother country how essential monarchy is to the enjoyment of constitutional liberty.
Page 13 - These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation. I call upon that right reverend bench, those holy ministers of the Gospel, and pious pastors of our church; I conjure them to join in the holy work, and vindicate the religion of their God. I appeal to the wisdom and the law of this learned bench to defend and support the justice of their country. I call upon the bishops...
Page 12 - I know not what ideas that lord may entertain of God and nature ; but I know that such abominable principles are equally abhorrent to religion and humanity. What...
Page 240 - Let us return to our legitimate home, and all jars and all quarrels will be lost in embraces.
Page 87 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me ; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy ! Pressed down, as I am, by the hand of infirmity, I am little able to assist my country in this most perilous conjuncture ; but, my lords, while I have sense and memory, I will. never consent to deprive the royal offspring of the House of Brunswick, the heirs of the princess Sophia, of their fairest inheritance.
Page 9 - You cannot conciliate America by your present measures. You cannot subdue her by your present, or by any measures. What, then, can you do? You cannot conquer; you cannot gain; but you can address; you can lull the fears and anxieties of the moment into an ignorance of the danger that should produce them.
Page 13 - ... unsullied sanctity of their lawn ; upon the learned judges to interpose the purity of their ermine to save us from this pollution. I call upon the honour of your lordships to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country to vindicate the national character. I invoke the genius of the constitution.
Page 457 - House on the subject of the war, by moving, " that the further prosecution of " offensive hostilities, for the purpose of reducing the " revolted colonies to obedience by force, would weaken " the efforts of Great Britain against her European " enemies, increase the mutual enmity so fatal both to " Great Britain and America, and, by preventing a " happy reconciliation with that country, frustrate the " desire expressed by his Majesty of restoring the bles" sings of peace and tranquillity.

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