Old and new London: a narrative of its history, its people and its places, by W. Thornbury (E. Walford). (Google eBook)

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1880
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Page 349 - Ambition this shall tempt to rise, Then whirl the wretch from high, To bitter Scorn a sacrifice, And grinning Infamy. The stings of Falsehood those shall try, And hard Unkindness...
Page 570 - Sir, if you wish to have a just notion of the magnitude of this city, you must not be satisfied with seeing its great streets and squares, but must survey the innumerable little lanes and courts. It is not in the showy evolutions of buildings, but in the multiplicity of human habitations which are crowded together, that the wonderful immensity of London consists.
Page 106 - Oh, ever thus, from childhood's hour, I've seen my fondest hopes decay ; I never loved a tree or flower But 'twas the first to fade away ; I never nursed a dear gazelle, To glad me with its soft black eye, But when it came to know me well, And love me, it was sure to die.
Page 169 - Us, the point upwards : next came the Queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic ; her face oblong, fair, but wrinkled ; her eyes small, yet black and pleasant ; her nose a little hooked ; her lips narrow and her teeth black (a defect the English seem subject to, from their too great use of sugar...
Page 447 - Alas, Sir, these are all only struggles for happiness. When I first entered Ranelagh, it gave an expansion and gay sensation to my mind, such as I never experienced anywhere else. But, as Xerxes wept when he viewed his immense army, and considered that not one of that great multitude would be alive a hundred years afterwards, so it went to my heart to consider that there was not one in all that brilliant circle, that was not afraid to go home and think ; but that the thoughts of each individual there,...
Page 190 - Most certainly, Sir, for those who know them have a very great advantage over those who do not. Nay, Sir, it is wonderful what a difference learning makes upon people even in the common intercourse of life, which does not appear to be much connected with it.
Page 386 - And bitch and rogue her answer was to all. Nay, even the parts of shame by name would call : Yea, when she passed by or lane or nook, Would greet the man who turn'd him to the wall, And by his hand obscene the porter took, Nor ever did askance like modest virgin look. Such place hath Deptford, navy-building town, Woolwich and Wapping, smelling strong of pitch ; Such Lambeth, envy of each band and gown, And Twickenham such, which fairer scenes enrich, Grots, statues, urns, and Jo n's dog and bitch.
Page 53 - To this entertainment, there often follows that of whipping a blinded bear, which is performed by five or six men, standing circularly with whips, which they exercise upon him without any mercy, as he cannot escape from them because of his chain ; he defends himself with all his force and skill, throwing down all who come within his reach, and are not active enough to get out of it, and tearing the whips out of their hands, and breaking them.
Page 34 - I know no man, (said he,) who is more master of his wife and family than Thrale. If he but holds up a finger, he is obeyed. It is a great mistake to suppose that she is above him in literary attainments. She is more flippant ; but he has ten times her learning : he is a regular scholar ; but her learning is that of a school -boy in one of the lower forms.
Page 313 - His reason drown'd in Jenkinson's champagne, A rustic's hand, but righteous fate withstood, Had shed a Premier's for a robber's blood.

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