Film, a Modern Art (Google eBook)

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Associated University Presses, Jan 1, 1986 - Performing Arts - 503 pages
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Contents

IV
23
V
31
VI
37
VII
44
VIII
52
IX
60
X
68
XI
75
XLIII
267
XLIV
269
XLV
275
XLVI
280
XLVII
283
XLVIII
285
XLIX
287
L
289

XII
81
XIII
87
XIV
89
XV
100
XVI
109
XVII
113
XVIII
124
XIX
129
XX
142
XXI
147
XXII
157
XXIII
164
XXIV
174
XXV
178
XXVI
181
XXVII
189
XXVIII
194
XXIX
197
XXX
201
XXXI
208
XXXII
212
XXXIII
215
XXXIV
218
XXXV
225
XXXVI
228
XXXVII
236
XXXVIII
243
XXXIX
249
XL
255
XLI
261
XLII
265
LI
295
LII
301
LIII
305
LIV
311
LV
315
LVI
322
LVII
329
LVIII
334
LIX
337
LX
342
LXI
356
LXII
363
LXIII
368
LXIV
374
LXV
376
LXVI
380
LXVII
385
LXVIII
392
LXIX
400
LXX
402
LXXI
406
LXXII
413
LXXIII
421
LXXIV
427
LXXV
431
LXXVI
433
LXXVII
441
LXXVIII
452
LXXIX
467
LXXX
468
Copyright

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Page 32 - Also, to declare how astounded I have been by the amazing changes that I have seen around me on every side — changes moral, changes physical, changes in the amount of land subdued and peopled, changes in the rise of vast new cities, changes in the growth of older cities almost out of recognition, changes in the graces and amenities of life, changes in the press, without whose advancement no advancement can be made anywhere.
Page 29 - A conduct that is truly our own, on the contrary, is that of a will which does not try to counterfeit intellect, and which, remaining itself — that is to say, evolving — ripens gradually into acts which the intellect will be able to resolve indefinitely into intelligible elements without ever reaching its goal. The free act is incommensurable with the idea, and its "rationality...
Page 40 - ... things." It appears to me that, for the critics and the public, the painting of Raphael, Rubens, Rembrandt, etc., has become nothing more than a conglomeration of countless "things," which conceal its true value — the feeling which gave rise to it. The virtuosity of the objective representation is the only thing admired. If it were possible to extract from the works of the great masters the feeling expressed in them — the actual artistic value, that is — and to hide this away, the public,...
Page 27 - The pure work implies the elocutory disappearance of the poet, who abandons the initiative to words mobilized by the shock of their inequality; they light one another up with mutual reflections like a virtual trail of fire upon precious stones, replacing the breathing perceptible in the old lyrical blast.
Page 40 - The black square on the white field was the first form in which nonobjective feeling came to be expressed. The square = feeling, the white field = the void beyond this feeling.
Page 40 - The modern sculptors have arrived at the concept of the universal analogy of form, the concept of all human, animal, and vegetable forms as different manifestations of common principles of architecture, of which the geometric forms in their infinity of relations are all symbols; and at the concept of the meaning of geometric relation as the symbolisation of this universal analogy of...
Page 30 - ... the kaleidoscopic character of our adaptation to them. The cinematographical method is therefore the only practical method, since it consists in making the general character of knowledge form itself on that of action, while expecting that the detail of each act should depend in its turn on that of knowledge. In order that action may always be enlightened, intelligence must always be present in it; but intelligence, in order thus to accompany the progress of activity and ensure its direction,...

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