A Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon: Or, the Trade Language of Oregon (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cramoisy Press, 1863 - Chinook jargon - 43 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page vi - Negro-English-Dutch of Surinam, the Pigeon English of China, and several other mixed tongues, dates back to the fur droguers of the last century. Those mariners whose enterprise in the fifteen years preceding 1800, explored the intricacies of the northwest coast of America, picked up at their general rendezvous, Nootka Sound, various native words useful in barter, and thence transplanted them, with additions from the English, to the shores of Oregon.
Page vi - Surinam, the Pigeon English of China, and several other mixed tongues, dates back to the fur droguers of the last century. Those mariners whose enterprise in the fifteen years preceding 1800, explored the intricacies of the northwest coast of America, picked up at their general rendezvous, Nootka Sound, various native words useful in barter, and thence transplanted them, with additions from the English, to the shores of Oregon. Even before their day, the coasting trade and warlike expeditions of...
Page 24 - Stick, n., adj. English, idem. A stick; a tree; wood; wooden. Stick skin, bark; ship stick, a mast; mitwhit stick, a standing tree; icht stick, a yard measure; stick shoes, leather shoes or boots, as distinguished from skin shoes or moccasins ; kull stick, oak (hard wood) ; isick stick, the ath (paddle wood).
Page x - ... 1620. Santa Rosa and Fernandina, in Florida, retain with their ancient names many a relic and ruin of Spanish days, and California is almost altogether Spanish, as far as local names and the most familiar expressions are concerned. Spanish words, especially those relating to horses and mules and to their equipments, have of late come into general use in Oregon, owing to intercourse with California.
Page vi - English were then brought in, and for the first time the French, or rather the Canadian and Missouri patois of the French, was introduced. The principal seat of the company being at Astoria, not only a large addition of Chinook words was made, but a considerable number was taken frpm the Chihalis, who immediately bordered that tribe on the north.
Page 4 - Mamook hahlakl la pote, open the door; chahko hallakl (as of the woods), to open out; become less dense. Haht-haht, n. Nisqually, HATHAT. The mallard duck. Hak-at-shum, n. English. A handkerchief. Ha'-lo, adj. Quaere ud not Chinook. None; absent. Q. Halo salmon mika? have you no fish? A. Halo, none. Q. Kah mika papa? where is your father? A. Halo, he is out. Halo wind, breathless; dead; halo glease, lean; halo ikta, poor; destitute. Haul, v. English, idem. To haul or pull. Used with the active verb...
Page ix - The number of words constituting the Jargon proper has been variously stated. Many formerly employed have become in great measure obsolete, while others have been locally introduced. Thus, at the Dalles of the Columbia, various terms are common which would not be intelligible at Astoria or on Puget Sound. In making the following selection, I have included all those which, on reference to a number of vocabularies, I have found current at any of these places, rejecting, on the other hand, such as individuals,...
Page 27 - I am undecided, ie, / have two wills. Q. Kah nesika klatawa? where shall we go? A. Mika tumtum, wherever you please; as you will. Ikta mika tumtum? what do you think? Halo tumtum, without a will of one's own, as a child. The heart seems to be generally regarded as the seat of the mind or will. Tum-wa'-ta, n.
Page 23 - The origin of this designation, as related to me by Mr. Anderson, was as follows. Mr. Archibald R. McLeod, a chief factor of the Hudson's Bay Company, in the year 1828, while crossing the mountains with a pack train, was overtaken by a snow storm, in which he lost most of his animals, including a noted bob-tailed race-horse. His Canadian followers, in compliment to their chief, or "bourgeois...
Page v - A copy of Mr. Lionnet's vocabulary having been sent to me, with a request to make such corrections as it might require, I concluded not merely to collate the words contained in this and other printed and manuscript vocabularies, but to ascertain, so far as possible, the languages which had contributed to it, with the original Indian words. This had become the more important, as its extended use by different tribes had led to ethnological errors in the classing together of essentially distinct families....

Bibliographic information