Bailout: An Insider's Account of Bank Failures and Rescues (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Beard Books, Jun 1, 2000 - Business & Economics - 299 pages
4 Reviews
During the high interest times in the 1970's and 1980's, the banks and the savings and loan associations were under heavy financial pressure. Hundreds of them failed. The Home Loan Bank Board permitted the savings and loan associations to treat goodwill as capital, thereby allowing them to remain open and to build up enormous losses that eventually cost the taxpayers billions of dollars. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation took a different approach. It closed the banks or sold them, all at no cost to the taxpayers. Bailout is the engrossing story of how the FDIC handled four of these failures. Book jacket.
  

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Review: Bailout: An Insider's Account of Bank Failures and Rescues

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Should be required reading together with Sheila Bair's latest Read full review

Review: Bailout: An Insider's Account of Bank Failures and Rescues

User Review  - Goodreads

Should be required reading together with Sheila Bair's latest Read full review

Contents

Bailout The Thesis Is Introduced
3
The Legal Framework The Law and the Regulators Who Interpret It
12
Unity Bank The Essentiality Doctrine Is Established
35
Bank of the Commonwealth The First Bailout of a BillionDollar Bank
53
First Pennsylvania Bank The Prototype Is Created for Megabank Bailouts
77
Penn Square A Small Oklahoma City Bank Triggers a Crisis
109
Seafirst The First Major Casualty from Penn Square
135
Seven Days in May Continental Is Saved from Certain Failure
149
The Treasury Tiger Treasury Complicates the Rescue
182
Choosing the Management The SwearingenOgden Team Is Selected
200
Liquidation The Fed the Board and the Bad Loans
213
Lessons Learned History Does Tell Us Something
231
The Public Policy Debate Serious Questions Are Raised About Bailouts
242
APPENDIX
265
NOTES
271
INDEX
281

May to July Search for Continental Solution Is Underway
165

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About the author (2000)

Sprague retired in 1986 after 11 years as Chairman or Director of the FDIC. He had been appointed to the FDIC by two presidents.

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