Modern Women and what is Said of Them: Reprint of a Series of Articles in the Saturday Review (Google eBook)

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J. S. Redfield, 1868 - Women - 371 pages
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Page 28 - If some fashionable devergondee en evidence is reported to have come out with her dress below her shoulder-blades, and a gold strap for all the sleeve thought necessary, the girl of the period...
Page 30 - ... the girl of the period. Love indeed is the last thing she thinks of, and the least of the dangers besetting her. Love in a cottage, that seductive dream which used to vex the heart and disturb the calculations of prudent mothers, is now a myth of past ages. The legal barter of herself for so much money, representing so much dash, so much luxury and pleasure that is her idea of marriage ; the only idea worth entertaining.
Page 30 - She has married his house, his carriage, his balance at the banker's, his title; and he himself is just the inevitable condition clogging the wheel of her fortune; at best an adjunct, to be tolerated with more or less patience as may chance. For it is only the old-fashioned sort, not girls of the period pur sang, that marry for love, or put the husband before the banker.
Page 31 - It cannot be too plainly told to the modern English girl that the net result of her present manner of life is to assimilate her as nearly as possible to a class of women we must not call by their proper - or improper - name.
Page 26 - The girl of the period is a creature who dyes her hair and paints her face, as the first articles of her personal religion ; whose sole idea of life is plenty of fun and luxury ; and whose dress is the object of such thought and intellect as she possesses.
Page 272 - It is well seen, O God, how thou goest : how thou, my God and King, goest in the sanctuary. 25 The singers go before, the minstrels follow after : in the midst are the damsels playing with the timbrels.
Page 27 - Nothing is too extraordinary and nothing too exaggerated for her vitiated taste; and things which in themselves would be useful reforms if let alone become monstrosities worse than those which they have displaced so soon as she begins to manipulate and improve. If a sensible fashion lifts the gown out of the mud, she raises hers midway to her knee. If the absurd structure of wire and buckram, once called a bonnet, is modified to something that shall protect the wearer's face without putting out the...
Page 26 - ... of the period is a creature who dyes her hair and paints her face, as the first articles of her personal religion ; whose sole idea of life is plenty of fun and luxury ; and whose dress is the object of such thought and intellect as she possesses. Her main endeavor in this is to outvie her neighbors in the extravagance of fashion.
Page 31 - For it is only the old-fashioned sort, not girls of the period pur sang, that marry for love, or put the husband before the banker. But she does not marry easily. Men are afraid of her; and with reason. They may amuse themselves with her for an evening, but they do not take her readily for life. Besides, after all her efforts, she is only a poor copy of the real thing; and the real thing is far more amusing than the copy, because it is real. Men can get that whenever they like; and when they go into...
Page 32 - All men whose opinion is worth having prefer the simple and genuine girl of the past, with her tender little ways and bashful modesties, to this loud and rampant modernisation, with her false red hair and painted skin, talking slang as glibly as a man, and by preference leading the conversation to doubtful subjects.

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