Christ Circumcised: A Study in Early Christian History and Difference (Google eBook)

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University of Pennsylvania Press, May 28, 2012 - Religion - 320 pages
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In the first full-length study of the circumcision of Jesus, Andrew S. Jacobs turns to an unexpected symbolóthe stereotypical mark of the Jewish covenant on the body of the Christian savioróto explore how and why we think about difference and identity in early Christianity.

Jacobs explores the subject of Christ's circumcision in texts dating from the first through seventh centuries of the Common Era. Using a diverse toolkit of approaches, including the psychoanalytic, postcolonial, and poststructuralist, he posits that while seeming to desire fixed borders and a clear distinction between self (Christian) and other (Jew, pagan, and heretic), early Christians consistently blurred and destabilized their own religious boundaries. He further argues that in this doubled approach to others, Christians mimicked the imperial discourse of the Roman Empire, which exerted its power through the management, not the erasure, of difference.

For Jacobs, the circumcision of Christ vividly illustrates a deep-seated Christian duality: the fear of and longing for an other, at once reviled and internalized. From his earliest appearance in the Gospel of Luke to the full-blown Feast of the Divine Circumcision in the medieval period, Christ circumcised represents a new way of imagining Christians and their creation of a new religious culture.

  

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Contents

Splitting the Difference
1
1 Circumcision and the Cultural Economy of Difference
15
The Dialogue of Difference
41
3 Heresy Theology and the Divine Circumcision
72
Epiphanius on the Jewish Christians
100
Reading Between the Lines
119
Ritual Differences
146
Conclusion
179
Notes
191
Bibliography
269
Index
309
Acknowledgments
313
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About the author (2012)

Andrew S. Jacobs is Associate Professor and Chair of the Religious Studies department at Scripps College and the author of Remains of the Jews.

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