Learning Objects: Theory, Praxis, Issues, and Trends (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Alex Koohang, Keith Harman
Informing Science, 2007 - Educational technology - 626 pages
2 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
1
IV
45
V
83
VI
113
VII
181
VIII
209
IX
259
X
337
XIII
507
XIV
527
XV
549
XVI
585
XVII
609
XVIII
617
XIX
619
XX
623

XI
371
XII
417

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 494 - Directive 2001/29/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 May 2001 on the harmonisation of certain aspects of copyright and related rights in the information society.
Page 194 - Standards are documented agreements containing technical specifications or other precise criteria to be used consistently as rules, guidelines, or definitions of characteristics, to ensure that materials, products, processes and services are fit for their purpose.
Page 339 - This standard defines usability as "the extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction in a specified context of use.
Page 355 - Match between system and the real world: The system should speak the users' language, with words, phrases, and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order. 3. User control and freedom: Users often choose system functions by mistake and will need a clearly marked "emergency exit" to leave the unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue.
Page 358 - Flexibility and efficiency of use Accelerators — unseen by the novice user — may often speed up the interaction for the expert user such that the system can cater to both inexperienced and experienced users. Allow users to tailor frequent actions.
Page 358 - Recognition rather than recall Make objects, actions, and options visible. The user should not have to remember information from one part of the dialogue to another. Instructions for use of the system should be visible or easily retrievable whenever appropriate.
Page 339 - Memorability: The system should be easy to remember, so that the casual user is able to return to the system after some period of not having used it, without having to learn everything all over again.
Page 359 - Help and documentation: Even though it is better if the system can be used without documentation, it may be necessary to provide help and documentation. Any such information should be easy to search, focused on the user's task, list concrete steps to be carried out, and not be too large.
Page 183 - This definition includes anything that can be delivered across the network on demand, be it large or small. Examples of smaller reusable digital resources include digital images or photos, live data feeds (like stock tickers), live or prerecorded video or audio snippets, small bits of text, animations, and smaller web-delivered applications, like a Javabased calculator.
Page 183 - Objects are defined here as any entity, digital or non-digital, which can be used, reused or referenced during technology supported learning.

Bibliographic information