Memoirs of the Different Rebellions in Ireland, from the Arrival of the English: Also: A Particular Detail of that which Broke Out the XxIIId of May, MDCCXCVIII; with the History of the Conspiracy which Preceded it, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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R. Marchbank, and sold by J. Archer, 1802 - Ireland - 583 pages
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Page 360 - Submit yourfelves to every ordinance of man " for the Lord's fake : whether it be to the King " as fupreme ; or unto Governors, as unto them " that are fent by him for the punifhment of evil " doers, and for the praife of them that do well.
Page 502 - ... powerfully supported by Edward Roche, who was a brother of Father Philip Roche, and himself a well-to-do farmer of the county. This man had been sergeant in a yeomanry regiment, and had deserted to the rebels, with most of the Catholics in his troop, at the beginning of the rebellion. He was soon after elected ' a general officer of the United army of the county of Wexford;' 2 and he issued, on June 7, a very remarkable proclamation to the rebels at Wexford.
Page 304 - Protestant, and being answered in the affirmative, they held a moment's consultation, and then told him that they wanted officers ; that if he would take an oath to be true to them, and join them in an attack to be made the next morning upon Monastereven, they would give him a command, but otherwise he must die.
Page 502 - I urge you to a speedy surrender, which you will be forced to do in a few hours with loss and bloodshed, as you are surrounded on all sides. Your answer is required in four hours. Mr. Furlong carries this letter, and will bring the answer. " I am, sir, &c. &c., " BB HARVEY. " Camp at Corbet Hill, half past three o'clock, morning, "June 5th, 1798.
Page 46 - Because, says he, those doctrines are DEFENDED, and CONTENDED for, by most Catholic nations, and the Holy See has frequently followed them in practice. On the whole he decides, " That, as the oath is in its whole extent unlawful, so in its nature it is invalid, null, and of no effect, so that it can by no means bind and oblige consciences.
Page 71 - ... a number of men rushed in, threw him on his face, and three of them stood on him and stabbed him repeatedly. They then put a cord round his neck, which they tightened so as to force out his tongue, part of which, as far as they could reach, they cut off. They then cut off the four fingers and thumb of his right hand, and left him on the floor, and proceeded to use his wife in the same manner.
Page 196 - ... in the names of three persons to the executive directory of the union, one of whom was appointed by them adjutant-general of the county, whose duty it was to receive and communicate military orders from the executive to the colonels of battalions, and in general to act as officers of the revolutionary staff.
Page 82 - Protestants of the established church, to defeat their malignant designs, found it necessary to excite and cherish a spirit of loyalty, which began to languish and decline in a very alarming- degree, and to rally round the altar and the throne, which were in imminent danger.
Page 155 - ... one member was delegated to an upper baronial committee, which in like manner affiimed and exercifed the fuperintendence and direction of all the lower baronial committees in the feveral counties.
Page 196 - They were required to inform themselves of, and report the state of the rebel regiments within their respective districts, of the number of mills, the roads, rivers, bridges, and fords, the military positions, the capacity of the towns and villages to receive troops, to communicate to the executive every movement of the enemy (meaning the King's troops), to announce the first appearance of their allies (meaning the French), and immediately to collect their forces."* Besides these, a military committee...

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